Class Catalog

Agriculture
Westbrook-Walnut Grove High Schools requires students to successfully complete two of three of the following courses as a graduation requirement: Into Agriculture, Intro Industrial Technology, or Intro Family & Consumer Education.

Agriculture is a part of our every day living. Agriculture provides us with the food on our table, trees in our yard, grass under our feet, and more than likely will provide us with a job either directly or indirectly!!!

Courses in Agriculture will give you hands on experience in plant care, animal care, mechanics, metals, electricity, and outdoor life, book keeping, and small business management.

A requirement to be a member of the FFA is that you take one vocational course for every two years of FFA membership.

Josh Barron and Mirinda Goblishi are the current Agriculture Instructors at Westbrook-Walnut Grove High School.
Ag Business Sales #15
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
Elective
Prerequisites:
Intro to Agriculture
Academic Standard(s):
Business Management

The course will study the competition and the market of an agricultural commodity, pursue publicity, create advertising and promotion campaigns, set prices, and keeping score of sales and profit margins.

 

Agribusiness Marketing #5
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
Elective
Prerequisites:
Intro to Agriculture
Academic Standard(s):
Agricultural Economic Systems

This course is designed around the Minnesota council of Economic Education. Included in this course will be Food markets, World Food Trade, Food Security, and Food Safety. Along with these four modules we will also be filling out the Proficiency and a State Degree. These require you to have or had a job. You will be required to fill out an application, do a resume, and complete an interview.

 

Animal Science #3
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
Elective
Prerequisites:
Intro to Agriculture
Academic Standard(s):
None

This course is designed to teach basic science concepts involved in the production of agriculutral animals. Included in this couse is animal behavior, classification, consumer concerns, animal welfare, genetics, reproduction, nutrition , meat science, paracites, and diseases. In addition we will be discussing some of the agricultural animals such as cattle, pigs, chickens, sheep, aquaculture, and alternative animal agiculture.
This course will include; field trips to a number of farms, dissections of different animals, poster projects and labs in which the class eats different foods from animals. Another assesment will be in the form of tests and quizes.

This course is designed to acquaint the student with animal management, nutrition, feeding, reproduction, disease, health, and marketing.

Large Animal Science
2015 Fall Semester
Time Periods 5 & 6
TC Ag Room
Mrs. Goblish

Objective
This class has two goals. The first is to introduce students to the broad field of animal science. The second is to develop an appreciation of the importance of the livestock in American Agriculture and to the American economy. The student should become acquainted with the basic principles of modern livestock production through discussions of animal anatomy, genetics and breeding, lactation, growth and body composition, and nutrition.

Class overview

1. Domestication and Importance of Livestock
2. Career Opportunities in Animal Science
3. Safety in Livestock Production
4. Livestock and the Environment
5. Anatomy, Physiology, Feeding, and Nutrition
6. Animal Breeding
7. Beef Cattle
8. Swine
9. Sheep and Goats
10. Poultry
11. Dairy
12. Horses
13. Alternative animals


Grading Scale
A 100-95%
A- 94-92%
B+ 91-89%
B 88-86%
B- 85-83%
C+ 82-80%
C 79-77%
C- 76-74%
D+ 73-71%
D 70-68%
D- 67-65%
F 64-00%

 Attendance is graded
i. 3 unexcused absences equals 1 grade deduction
ii. 3 unexcused tardy equals 1 absence
 Grade breakdown
i. Tests/ quizzes  50 %
ii. Homework  25%
iii. Labs/ Field Trips  25%
1. If unexcused absence from a field trip you lose all points for the day but does not count as one of your three
2. If excused you must type a one page paper over the field trip topic to be handed in by the end of the next week.
 If an assignment is not handed in by due date 0 points
 If an assignment is not completed by due date will receive points for finished material but that is all
 Dress appropriately for field trips

Rules
** Be Safe on field trips
** Listen to instructor, sub and each other
** Absent students will have two days to make up missed work
** Stay positive

 

Greenhouse/Landscape Management #10
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
Elective
Prerequisites:
"C" in Horticulture
Academic Standard(s):
Natural/Managed Systems

Students will manage the Charger Greenhouse. This will include the selection and ordering of plants, greenhouse set-up, plant care, customer service, designing planters, inventory plant supplies, working with money, advertising, and selling plant products.

Students will also complete a variety of Landscape project.

 

Intro to Agriculture #1
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
9, 10
Required:
Partially fulfills vocational requirement
Prerequisites:
None
Academic Standard(s):
Community Interaction

Introductory course in agriscience and technology to acquaint the student with as many areas as possible. Introductory Units to be covered based on time include: Out Door Life, Natural Resources, Horticulture, Landscape Design, Leadership, Parliamentary Procedure, Animal Science, Small Animal Care, Agriculture Sales, Agriculture Marketing, and Food Technology.

 

Mechanics #7
Credits:
.5 to 1 varies
Grade:
10-12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Intro to Ag
Academic Standard(s):
Technical Applications

Provide students with a working understanding of the different fields and areas of employment available in the mechanics. We will be taking apart small engines and working with electicity. We will also be talking and practicing car maintenance to prolong the life of your vehical.

 

Metals #91
Credits:
.5
Grade:
10-12
Required:
Elective
Prerequisites:
Intro to Ag
Academic Standard(s):

In this class you will become profiecent in the use of arc, oxy acetlyene, and wire feed welding. This class you will also plasma cut and do metal fabrication. Intro to Ag is prerequisite for this class

 

Natural Resource Management #10
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
no
Prerequisites:
Outdoor life
Academic Standard(s):
none

Natural Resource Management,
Q 4 Period 3


This course is designed to give the students an understanding of Soil and Water Management, Surveying and Land Measurement, Natural Resource Management and Agriculture Building and Structures. This would be offered opposite of Outdoor Life and would focus on implementation and expansion in that course. This would be a multi year program with the first year focusing on determination of areas of need. Areas of interest are the North East corner of the Tech campus and the East side of the Family and Consumer Science room.

Phase One: Determine the areas of need and what can be done to solve the problem. Then surveying the land to determine the amount of space that is available and the amount of material needed. Next is to decide what the students can do as a class using pavers, modular block, and or timbers. Through this the students would get a hands on approach to surveying, commercial enterprises, design, soil characteristics, tool use and identification, drawing skills, and communication. This course is designed as a 4th Quarter class project because it requires the students to be outside without the hindrance of snow.

 

Outdoor Life/Wildlife #12
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
Elective
Prerequisites:
Intro to Agriculture
Academic Standard(s):
Natural/Managed Systems

This course will utilize the DNR - Advanced Hunter Education Material and will cover topics such as hunting rights; habits, identification, and management of small game, waterfowl, big game, and fish; planning a hunt; and laws, ethics, regulations, and hunting behavior.

When the course is offered in conjunction with Environmental Science, an interdisciplinary project involving the use of GPS may be pursued.

Students will be able to take the Advance Hunter Certification Test upon completion of the course.

 

Small Animal Care #6
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
Elective
Prerequisites:
Intro to Agriculture
Academic Standard(s):
None

Small animal care is designed for the student interested in caring for small animals and assisting with Veterinary Medicine. Students will cover animal identification, clinic safety, animal care, clinical procedures, communication skills, and basic office procedures.

 

Business
The Business department at WWG High School offers courses that will start the foundation for a career in the business world.

Business Applications is a business entrepreneur class that will use the vinyl and engraving machines to make and sell products for a hands-on experience. Keyboarding is a required course. Courses in accounting, business law, personal finance, computer applications, and word processing are also offered.

Mr. Theisen and Mr. Blahnik make up the Business department staff.
Accounting I #25
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
Elective
Prerequisites:
Basic math background
Academic Standard(s):

Introduction to basic double-entry bookkeeping principles. This course is often referred to as the "language of business." Through accounting simulations students will learn to keep neat and accurate business records. All coarse work is done online with the Aplia.com program.

 

Accounting II #26
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
Elective
Prerequisites:
Accounting I
Academic Standard(s):
Financial Systems

A continuation and expansion on the principles learned in Accounting I. Emphasis on payroll, state and federal reports, partnerships and corporations. Accounting computer software and spreadsheets are used. [possible TELEMEDIA] Resource Management-Financial Management and Resource Management-Family Resource Management assessment package used.

 

Accounting III #31
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
Elective
Prerequisites:
Accounting II
Academic Standard(s):
Resource Mangmnt-Fin. Management

A continuation and expansion on the principles learned in Accounting II. Emphasis on payroll, state and federal reports, partnerships and corporations. Computerized accounting is emphasized.

 

Applied Economics (BOLT) #27
Credits:
.5 to 2 varies
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
Elective
Prerequisites:
none
Academic Standard(s):
Market Research, A Business Plan, New Product Development

Objective: This course will focus on the following topics ;while also conducting operations of the BOLT business: -
-principles of economics; supply & demand; micro-economics
-starting a business in Minnesota
-measuring demographics, area need, business focus
-keeping books for your business
-federal and state business regulations
-writing a business plan/funding your business
-creating professional-looking presentations
-presentation of your business and yourself for success
-examining profit/loss statements
-what do other businesses do that makes them successful?
Examining leaders in business
-in a capitalistic system, it is survival of the fittest. So what about ethics?
Grade Breakdown: 65% class participation
20% assignments/tests/quizzes
15% demonstration skills and participation

See syllabus for details.

 

Business/Personal Law #29
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
None
Academic Standard(s):
Inquiry; Reasearch Process

Study business contracts, insurance, leasing & owning property, court system, & crime. Small Claims Court field trip. [possible TELEMEDIA] Grad Standard: Business Management

 

Computer Applications #24
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Required:
Elective
Prerequisites:
Computer Keyboarding & Word Processing
Academic Standard(s):
Technical Systems

Introduction to desktop spreadsheet construction and use, data base, web page construction, graphics and art software, power point presentations, and applications of Microsoft applications for writing term papers and other assignments.

 

Computer Keyboarding #19
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
7-8
Required:
Required
Prerequisites:
None
Academic Standard(s):
Technical Systems

Basic keyboarding and typing of letters, tables & manuscripts. This is a prerequisite for most computer courses and for several business courses. Keyboarding is now offered in the 7th and 8th grade.

 

Computer Word Processing #21
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Required:
Elective
Prerequisites:
Computer Keyboarding
Academic Standard(s):

Continuation of skills learned in Typing using a computer. Software will be used to expand word processing knowledge. Helpful for research paper writing.

 

Personal Finance #102
Credits:
.5
Grade:
10-12
Required:
Prerequisites:
None
Academic Standard(s):

Class Objectives
What We’ll Be Doing This Year. . .
Consider this: in a matter of a few short years, many of you will leave home and begin living on your own. SCARY, I know! Lucky for you, you have a Personal Finance course, specially designed to help you “make it” in the real world, right here at your disposal. In Personal Finance, the goal is to become financially literate—meaning you should be able to understand everyday finances (and ultimately use your new understanding of finances to make better financial choices in the future).

 

Communications
Westbrook-Walnut Grove High Schools requires students to successfully earn four and a half Language Arts credits in order to graduate, which equates to semester-length English courses in both grades nine and ten, and five additional quarter courses in grades 11 and 12. The courses in grades 11 and 12 must include a half credit (quarter course) in each of four areas: speech, literature, communications, and writing. Cathy Baumann offers ELL options.

Paula Byers and Adrienne Kletscher comprise the Language Arts faculty at Westbrook-Walnut Grove Secondary.
Advanced Theatre #54
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
fulfills Communications (C) requirement for Englis
Prerequisites:
Theatre or instructor permission
Academic Standard(s):
none

Directing, set and light design and selected individual topics.

 

American Literature #48
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
fulfills Literature (L) requirement for English
Prerequisites:
English 10
Academic Standard(s):

American Literature is an elective Language Arts course for students to study literary forms and movements throughout American history. Students will read and respond to the texts through a multicultural and thematic approach. Units of study will include Native American literature, Puritan/Colonial literature, Revolutionary literature, Romanticism, Transcendentalism, Realism, and Modernism.

 

British Literature #41
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
fulfills Literature (L) requirement in English
Prerequisites:
English 10
Academic Standard(s):
Literature & Arts Analysis & Interpretation

Survey of prose, poetry, and drama of well known writers of Great Britain from the Anglo-Saxon period through the Victorian Age to the present..

 

College Composition #225
Credits:
.5 WWG, 4 SMSU Cr.
Grade:
11-12
Required:
Elective
Prerequisites:
College Prep Writing
Academic Standard(s):

The class follows a syllabus typical of first year college composition and includes writing a variety of products for a variety of audiences. Emphasis is placed on the writing process and on writing with widely accepted forms. Completing the course successfully will earn the student Southwest Minnesota State University college credit.

 

College Prep Writing #39
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
fulfills Writing (W) requirement for English
Prerequisites:
English 10
Academic Standard(s):
Academic Writing

Students will learn and practice skills necessary to succeed in college classes requiring expository writing and narrative writing. Expository writing will include personal essays and persuasion. Narrative writing will include personal experience writing. Students will review selected grammar and mechanics topics, including punctuation.

 

Creative Writing #52
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
fulfills Writing (W) requirement for English
Prerequisites:
English 10
Academic Standard(s):

Creative Writing is an elective Language Arts course for students to both observe and practice the literary techniques of writing creatively. It explores the genres of creative nonfiction, fiction, drama, and poetry. This is a writing intensive course where students must be prepared to critically evaluate the work of themselves as well as others.

 

Desktop Publishing #30
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
10,11, 12
Required:
fulfills Communication (C) requirement for English
Prerequisites:
English 10
Academic Standard(s):
none

Desktop publishing is a class in which students learn design elements and principles that are then employed using desktop publishing technologies to create common desktop publishing products. Students will use desktop publishing software such as PhotoShop and Illustrator, , as well as scanning software and digital cameras to combine text and graphics.


Students will be able to use the design elements and principles in original compositions.
Students will be able to scan and take photographs, and process the images for use in original compositions.
Students will be able to use desktop publishing software to create original compositions.
Students will be able to describe the careers common in the desktop publishing business.
Students will be able to design presentations using desktop publishing principles and technologies.
Students will be able to describe the desktop publishing process.

 

English 07 #464
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
7
Required:
Required
Prerequisites:
None
Academic Standard(s):

 

English 08 #466
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
8
Required:
Required
Prerequisites:
None
Academic Standard(s):

English 8 is a required course that works to build students skills in communication arts and literature. Writing will be a focus throughout the course with an emphasis in paragraph and essay writing. Students will also explore various genres of literature including fiction, nonfiction, drama, poetry, and folklore. They will also have units of study in digital and media literacy. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to practice their speaking and listening skills through various class presentations and discussions, along with a unit in debate.

 

English 09 #36
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
9
Required:
required
Prerequisites:
English 08
Academic Standard(s):
None

English I is a required course that works to build students skills in the areas of grammar, writing, reading, and vocabulary. The skills learned in this class will build on students current knowledge of the English language and will push students to become more diverse writers who use a variety of sentence, paragraph, and essay structure. Students will also study several genres of literature: drama, nonfiction, and fiction.

 

English II #37
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
10
Required:
required
Prerequisites:
English I
Academic Standard(s):

The purpose of the class is to reinforce students' reading, writing, literary, and language skills and to prepare students for advanced Language Arts classes and language events in life. It is the last survey class before the more specialized classes offered to Juniors and Seniors.

Students will be engaged in a variety of activities that will include writing reflective, analytical, interpretive, and evaluative paragraphs and essays and creative short stories.

Students will read non-fiction material, poetry, several short stories, a play, and a novel, focusing on irony, argument, and figurative language. Note that the literature used in the class is, in many cases, controversial. Many pieces contain mature themes and coarse language. They are also rich in their artistic and cultural significance. Please don't hesitate to contact me to discuss a class selection.

Students will work through projects that might include a video interpretation of a piece of literature, the creation of a game based on a literary work or series of language concepts, and research.

Students will review the parts of speech and learn and practice language concepts such as pronoun usage and phrase identification, applying the concepts to writing activities.

 

Fiction #53
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
fulfills Literature (L) requirement for English
Prerequisites:
English 10
Academic Standard(s):
Creation and Performance & Arts Analysis and Interpretation

Students will read, analyze, and respond to various short stories written by a variety of authors. Students will also have the opportunity to create a short story of their own. The novel, "Lord of The Flies" will be read by the students.


 

Journalism #43
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
fulfills Communication (L) or Writing (W) requirem
Prerequisites:
English II
Academic Standard(s):
Academic Writing

Journalism is an elective Language Arts class that introduces students to the basics of journalistic writing. A range of topics will be covered including: news elements, interviewing, headlines, news writing, feature writing, sports writing, editorial writing, column writing, and ethics. As the class progresses, students will publish a weekly school newspaper.

 

Novels #49
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
fulfills Literature (L) requirement for English.
Prerequisites:
English 10
Academic Standard(s):
Literature & Arts Analysis and Interpretation

Independent and group study of various works of fiction. The first part of the quarter is spent reading and discussing a common novel based on the Vietnam War. At the end of this novel, the student will create a CD based on the novel. The CD will contain music selected by the student that will support the elements of the novel. John Steinbeck's "Of Mice and Men" will also be read.

 

Reading 7A #497
Credits:
Grade:
7
Required:
Prerequisites:
Academic Standard(s):

Reading 7A
Quarter 3, 2012-2013

Ms. Stevenson
stevensonfac@wwgschools.org
Tech Building

Learning Objectives: By the end of the course, students will
Identify elements of stories.
Distinguish between types and styles of writing.
Use effective pre-, during and post-reading strategies.
Make inferences based on information provided.

Course Materials: Literature and Language, The Brooklyn Nine by Alan Gratz, notebook, folder and writing utensils - You must bring all materials and an IR book with you on a daily basis! If you do not have these materials, you will lose participation points.

Grading: Grades in this class will daily work, tests, and a project based on the novel. In addition, you may earn up to 10 points per week for attendance and participation. If you are absent, see me before or after class for missed work and to discuss any changes in due dates. You will receive one extra day per day absent to complete most assignments.

Progress reports will reflect missing assignments and overall grade. You will be placed on the ineligible list if your grade falls below a D- or if you are passing but missing a large assignment. Any student with more than five missing assignments of any size will automatically fail until assignments are complete!
95-100% A
93-94 A-
91-92 B+
86-90 B
84-85 B-
82-83 C+
77-81 C
75-76 C-
73-74 D+
67-72 D
65-66 D-
0-64 F

Rules:
Raise your hand to speak unless I specifically say otherwise.
Ask permission to leave your seat.
Do not wear hats or use cell phones.
Please do not eat or drink in this classroom.
I will not tolerate plagiarism under any circumstances. Be Honest! Any work found to be plagiarized or copied will receive a zero.
Respect!

Tips for Success:
Attendance and participation are just as important as homework - be on time and participate positively
We will have silent reading time every Tuesday and Thursday. Please bring your book to class and read silently.
Complete work on time. Late assignments lose 20% of their total points on the first day late and 40% after that.
Pass assignments to the front to turn them in. Anything completed after this time may go directly into the turn-in basket.
Use the weekly calendar as a guide for activities and assignments.

Semester Overview:
Unit 1: Reading Skills
Elements of Fiction
Types and Styles of Writing

Unit 2: The Brooklyn Nine
Apply skills from Unit 1
Pre-, During- and Post-Reading Strategies

 

Reading 8B #496
Credits:
Grade:
8
Required:
Prerequisites:
Academic Standard(s):

8th Grade Reading is a required class where students will study several genres of literature, learn various literary elements, and analyze literature using multiple reading strategies.

 

Resumes/Applications #174
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11,12
Required:
Prerequisites:
Teacher Approval
Academic Standard(s):

Students will compile records for an agriculture approved job or project. Complete a current resume. Complete one of the following applications: FFA state degree, FFA proficiency, or FFA scholarship. Local experts will be invited to share their career story and community role. Students will research and write a paper or reflection about a career possibility. Photos of students working at their job or with their project will be taken. Students will use the following computer programs: Excel, Photoshop, Word Processing, and Quicken. Students will use these programs to process their resume, application, photos, and financial records. Students will complete an exit interview with the option of advancing their project to the Region FFA level.

 

Shakespeare #45
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
fulfills Literature (L) requirement for English
Prerequisites:
English 10
Academic Standard(s):
Literature & Arts Analysis and Interpretation

Students will enjoy works by and related to William Shakespeare. Students will read deeply, analyzing and synthesizing to appreciate Shakespeare's themes and structures. Students will read a variety of plays, poems, and non-fiction works, and respond in several ways, including discussion, presentation. Students will research and report on aspects of Shakespeare’'s works, life, and culture that have impact on his art and on our contemporary lives. Students will learn and employ several terms related to literary analysis.

 

Shakespeare on-line #57
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
fulfills Literature (L) requirement for English
Prerequisites:
Consent of Instructor
Academic Standard(s):
none

Students will read, see, analyze and respond to several plays and poems by William Shakespeare. Students will research and report on aspects of Shakespeare's life and culture that impact on his art. Students will learn and use several terms related to literary criticism.
Students will communicate with their instructor indirectly through web-pages that identify learning task, resources, and criteria for evaluation; and directly by phone, EMail, "IRC," and possibly interactive television.

 

Speech #46
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
Required for graduation
Prerequisites:
English 10
Academic Standard(s):
Public Speaking

Students will explore the communication process and practice the skills necessary in becoming a competent communicator. Students will prepare and present speeches during the course of the study.

 

Super Reading #186
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
fulfills Literature (L) requirement for English
Prerequisites:
consent of principal and instructor
Academic Standard(s):
None

Course designed to boost reading skills.

 

Technical Writing / Reading #40
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
fulfills Writing (W) requirement in English
Prerequisites:
consent of instructor
Academic Standard(s):
Technical Writing

In depth work on types of technical reading and writing students will encounter in on-the-job situations such as individuallly reading and writing technical instructions, group oral proposal presentations, individually written formal proposals and groups creating manuals for on-site use. Included is a field trip.

 

TestClass #
Credits:
Grade:
Required:
Prerequisites:
Academic Standard(s):

 

Theater #47
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
fulfills Communication (C) or Fine Arts requiremen
Prerequisites:
English 10
Academic Standard(s):
Literature & Arts Create/Perform

Students will learn the basics of acting and movement on stage. Students will use these skills to produce one act plays throughtout the quarter. An audience will be invited to see the plays. This is a class where the student is out of their seats and on stage doing creative and fun things!

 

TV News Production #44
Credits:
.5
Grade:
11-12
Required:
Elective
Prerequisites:
English 2
Academic Standard(s):

When the class is conducted concurrently with Journalism, the class focuses on the technical aspects of broadcasting television news from our television studio. When not conducted concurrently, the class focuses on technical aspects of broadcasting television news but also on journalism concepts and practices, such as straight news and feature story structure, interview techniques, news coverage, and photography. The class satisfies the communications language arts requirement.

 

Video Production #50
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
fulfills Communication (C) requirement for English
Prerequisites:
consent
Academic Standard(s):
Creation and Performance or Arts Analysis and Interpretation

Students will use video, video editing, lighting, and audio mixing equipment
to produce video productions to include journalistic, essay, narrative, and commercial products. Students will learn and employ several terms related to video production and video production analysis.

 

War In American Literature #34
Credits:
.5
Grade:
10-12
Required:
Elective
Prerequisites:
English 2
Academic Standard(s):

The class will read several American works, examining the often conflicting depictions of America in war. Authors might include Crane, Hemmingway, Heller, and O'Brien. Students will read and respond to the literature and learn and use the language of literary study.

 

Weekly Newpaper Production #51
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
fulfills Communications (C) requirement for Englis
Prerequisites:
Journalism or Consent of instructor
Academic Standard(s):
none

Make weekly student/school newspaper and related articles.

 

World Literature #42
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
fulfills Literature (L) requirement for English
Prerequisites:
English 10
Academic Standard(s):
Literature Arts Analysis and Interpretation

Students read, analyze, and respond to several movements in the history of the worlds literature, including the epic, Greek theater, Chinese nature poetry, Romanticism, Realism, and Central American Mysticism. Students will learn and employ several terms related to literary analysis.

 

Family and Consumer Education
Family and Consumer Science, previously known as Home Economics, prepares a student for life on their own. Courses in this department will teach you how to prepare nutritious meals, operate a sewing machine, take care of your children and family, balance your checkbook, and decorate your home. All of the course offerings in this department include hands on projects for the students to apply their newly acquired skills.


Sally Oltmanns is the Family and Consumer Science teacher.
#171
Credits:
Grade:
Required:
Elective
Prerequisites:
Academic Standard(s):

 

Child Care #83
Credits:
.5 to 1 varies
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
none
Academic Standard(s):
Occupational Experience

If you enjoy working with children and wish to explore careers in this field, this may interest you. There will be speakers from the field of child care, field trips, and an opportunity to work with young children in the daycare setting.


Book: The Child Care Professional


Classroom Procedures
1. Be on time to class; if you are late bring a pass from the office.
2. Bring all items with you to class. Book, notebook, pen or pencil.
3. No food or pop in the classroom (you may have water); this also includes candy. On days that there are food labs you may bring something other than water to drink.
4. Sit on chairs not the tables or counters. Chairs are not to be used as footrests and heads should not rest on the table.
5. Follow directions and do your own work.
6. Your attention is expected when the teacher is talking or a classmate is speaking.
7. Raise your hand to speak in class.
8. If you know you are going to be absent, take care of your work ahead of time. YOU are responsible for getting the makeup work. You will be given 1 day to make up work.
9. All assignments are due at the beginning of the hour unless you are told differently.
10. Late assignments will be docked 10% each day they are late.



Grading:
A 95-100 B- 83-85 D+ 71-73
A- 92-94 C+ 80-82 D 68-70
B+ 89-91 C 77-79 D- 65-67
B 86-88 C- 74-76 F 64 and below

 

Child Development #76
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
partially fulfills Senior Social Studies requireme
Prerequisites:
consent of principal if on Telemedia
Academic Standard(s):
Case Study

We all relate to children in some way. Become aware of the growth and development of a child from conception to age six. This class will include observing or working directly with children of all ages.

Objectives:
1. The student will understand conception, pregnancy and birth.
2. The student will learn about the development of children from birth to age 6.
3. The student will work directly with children ages 1-5.
4. The student will learn about effective parenting skills.
5. The student will learn about child development careers.


CHILD DEVELOPMENT  Textbook: The Developing Child by Holly Brisbane

We will cover the following chapters in this textbook:

Chapter 5  Prenatal Development
Chapter 6  Preparing for Birth
Chapter 7  The Babys Arrival
Chapter 8  Physical Development During the First Year
Chapter 9  Emotional & Social Development During the First Year
Chapter 10  Intellectual Development During the First Year
Chapter 11  Physical Development From One to Three
Chapter 12  Emotional & Social Development From One to Three
Chapter 13  Intellectual Development From One to Three
Chapter 14  Physical Development From Four to Six
Chapter 15  Emotional & Social Development From Four to Six
Chapter 16  Intellectual Development From Four to Six
Chapter 3  Effective Parenting Skills
Chapter 17  Health and Safety
Chapter 20  Careers Relating to Children


Grading:
A 95-100 B- 83-85 D+ 71-73
A- 92-94 C+ 80-82 D 68-70
B+ 89-91 C 77-79 D- 65-67
B 86-88 C- 74-76 F 64 and below

 

Clothing 1 #339
Credits:
.5
Grade:
9-12
Required:
Prerequisites:
Know how to sew.
Academic Standard(s):

Flannel boxers, sweatshirts and sweatpants are a few of the items you can make in this class. Previous sewing skills are preferred. This class will teach you the basics of sewing and the use of a serger. A minimum of two projects will be completed. The projects are on an individual basis according to your skills.

Objectives:
1. The student will demonstrate the appropriate use of equipment and safety procedures.
2. The student will know and use technical vocabulary while interpreting charts and drawings found on the pattern.
3. The student will prepare the fabric for the project.
4. The student will demonstrate the ability to read and interpret a set of graphics while completing a fabric construction project.
5. The student will demonstrate and use basic sewing techniques while constructing their project.


CLOTHING I: Textbook - Clothing, Fashion, Fabrics & Construction by Weber


We will cover the following in this textbook:

Sewing and Serging Handbook Section
Lesson 1  Selecting a Pattern
Lesson 2  Selecting Fabric
Lesson 3  Selecting Notions
Lesson 4  Using a Sewing Machine
Lesson 5  Using a Serger
Lesson 6  Identifying Sewing Equipment
Lesson 7  Understanding Patterns
Lesson 8  Adjusting a Pattern
Lesson 9  Preparing Fabric
Lesson 10  Laying Out a Pattern
Lesson 11  Cutting and Marking Fabric
Lesson 12  Stitching by Machine
Lesson 13  Stitching by Hand
Lesson 14  Pressing Fabric
Lesson 17  Sewing Plain Seams
Lesson 22  Putting in Hems
Lesson 23  Checking Fit


Grading:
A 95-100 B- 83-85 D+ 71-73
A- 92-94 C+ 80-82 D 68-70
B+ 89-91 C 77-79 D- 65-67
B 86-88 C- 74-76 F 64 and below

 

Clothing 2 #340
Credits:
.5
Grade:
9-12
Required:
Prerequisites:
must know how to sew
Academic Standard(s):

This course is designed for the more advanced student interested in furthering their knowledge and skills in fashion and textiles. Students will explore natural and man-made fibers and continue to develop their sewing skills. Sewing techniques and skills are refined through the construction of at least two garments. More challenging patterns are selected for construction and specific details are required to be included in the garments. Students will pick their projects to be constructed.

Objectives:

1. The student will investigate textile and fabric construction.
2. The student will know and use technical vocabulary while interpreting charts and drawings found on patterns.
3. The student will demonstrate appropriate use of equipment and safety procedures.
4. The student will demonstrate the ability to read, interpret, and follow step-by-step procedures on a more advanced pattern or fabric while completing a fabric construction project.
5. The student will use a technical manual to apply information from technical reading to operate, maintain, or repair a sewing machine or serger.


CLOTHING II: Textbook  Clothing, Fashion, Fabrics & Construction by Weber

We will cover the following chapters in this textbook:

Chapter 11  Textile Fibers
Chapter 12  Fabric Construction
Chapter 13  Fabric Finishes
Sewing and Serging Handbook Section
**The following will be covered for those patterns that include the following:
Lesson 8  Adjusting a Pattern
Lesson 15  Making Darts
Lesson 16  Gathering and Easing Fabric
Lesson 18  Applying Facings
Lesson 19  Making Casings
Lesson 20  Applying Fasteners
Lesson 21  Putting in Zippers
Lesson 24  Sewing Special Seams
Lesson 25  Making Tucks and Pleats
Lesson 26  Applying Interfacings
Lesson 27  Putting in Linings
Lesson 28  Sewing Collars
Lesson 29  Sewing Sleeves
Lesson 30  Sewing Cuffs
Lesson 31  Sewing Pockets
Lesson 32  Finishing Waistlines
Lesson 33  Applying Bias Bindings
Lesson 34  Adding Ruffles
Lesson 35  Adding Trims
Grading:
A 95-100 B- 83-85 D+ 71-73
A- 92-94 C+ 80-82 D 68-70
B+ 89-91 C 77-79 D- 65-67
B 86-88 C- 74-76 F 64 and below

 

Costume Making #80
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
elective, partially fulfills Senior Social Studies
Prerequisites:
none
Academic Standard(s):
Personal/Family Resource Management


This class will make costumes for school plays, musicals or the Laura Ingalls Wilder Paegaent. All supplies and materials will be furnished. Students taking this class must know how to sew, taken Intro to FACS or Clothing I.

Grading:
A 95-100 B- 83-85 D+ 71-73
A- 92-94 C+ 80-82 D 68-70
B+ 89-91 C 77-79 D- 65-67
B 86-88 C- 74-76 F 64 and below

 

Family Living #78
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
elective, partially fulfills Senior Social Studies
Prerequisites:
consent of principal if on telemedia
Academic Standard(s):
Personal/Family Resource Management

Discover the most important person in the world - you. Learn to communicate with others. Discussion is the key to this class. Topics discussed are types of families, communication, problem-solving, love and marriage.

Objectives:
1. The students will understand the importance of families in todays society.
2. The student will recognize the different types of families.
3. The student will learn the decision-making process.
4. The student will learn how to improve communication and resolve conflict.
5. The student will learn about Family Living careers.


FAMILY LIVING - Textbook  Families Today by Connie R. Sasse

We will cover the following chapters in this textbook:

Chapter 1  Families, Society and You
Chapter 2  Families Make A Difference
Chapter 3  Family Characteristics
Chapter 4  Families In A Changing World
Chapter 5  Roles and Relationships
Chapter 6  Improving Communication
Chapter 7  Resolving Conflicts
Chapter 8  Building Family Relationships
Chapter 11  Balancing Work and Family Life
Chapter 12  The Challenge of Change
Chapter 13  Divorce and Remarriage
Chapter 14  Handling Crises
Chapter 19  Understanding Love
Chapter 20  Understanding Sexuality
Chapter 29  Thinking About a Career
Chapter 30  Selecting A Partner
Chapter 31  Choosing Marriage
Chapter 32  Building A Strong Marriage
Chapter 33  The Parenting Question


Grading:
A 95-100 B- 83-85 D+ 71-73
A- 92-94 C+ 80-82 D 68-70
B+ 89-91 C 77-79 D- 65-67
B 86-88 C- 74-76 F 64 and below

 

Foods #84
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
none
Academic Standard(s):
none

This course includes a study of nutrition, food terms, kitchen equipment, accurate measuring and food safety. Foods units include meats, eggs, dairy products, fruits, vegetables, cereal products, breads and desserts. Table setting and service will also be covered and this will be used in the final meal.

Objectives:
1. The student will understand the basics of nutrition.
2. The student will understand and practice kitchen and food safety.
3. The student will be able to read, understand and prepare a recipe.
4. The student will be able to work cooperatively with other students.
5. The student will plan and carry out a meal plan.
6. The student will learn about Food careers.


FOODS - Textbook  Guide to Good Food by Largen and Bence

We will cover the following chapters in this textbook:

Chapter 2  Nutritional Needs
Chapter 3  Making Healthful Food Choices
Chapter 5  Safeguarding the Familys Health
Chapter 9  Kitchen Utensils
Chapter 11  The Smart Consumer
Chapter 12  Getting Started in the Kitchen
Chapter 13  Meat
Chapter 14  Poultry
Chapter 15  Fish and Shellfish
Chapter 16  Eggs
Chapter 17  Dairy Products
Chapter 18  Fruits
Chapter 19  Vegetables
Chapter 21  Cereal Products
Chapter 22  Breads
Chapter 23  Cakes, Cookies, Pies and Candies


Grading:
A 95-100 B- 83-85 D+ 71-73
A- 92-94 C+ 80-82 D 68-70
B+ 89-91 C 77-79 D- 65-67
B 86-88 C- 74-76 F 64 and below

 

Foods 2 #341
Credits:
.5
Grade:
9-12
Required:
Prerequisites:
Foods I
Academic Standard(s):

This course will include equipment demonstrations, popular foods and diets, recipe card project, preparation of hors doeuvres, soups, sauces, casseroles, wild game, garnishing, cake decorating and various specialty foods. Careers in the food industry are also discussed.


Objectives:
1. The student will explore career opportunities in the food industry.
2. The student will understand and practice kitchen and food safety.
6. The student will be able to read, understand and prepare a recipe.
7. The student will be able to work cooperatively in a kitchen group.
5. The student will demonstrate the proper use of kitchen equipment.
6. The student will research popular foods and diets.
7. The student will prepare a recipe card box and fill it with a variety of recipes.


FOODS II  Textbook: Guide to Good Food

Chapters covered in this book:

Chapter 6  Career Opportunities
Chapter 20  Salads, Casseroles, and Soups
Chapter 24  Parties, Picnics, and Dining Out
Chapter 25  Preserving Foods

Other items covered that are not in the book:

Equipment Demonstration
Popular Foods and Diets
Recipe Card Project
Hors doeuvres
Wild Game
Garnishing
Cake Decorating


Grading:
A 95-100 B- 83-85 D+ 71-73
A- 92-94 C+ 80-82 D 68-70
B+ 89-91 C 77-79 D- 65-67
B 86-88 C- 74-76 F 64 and below

 

Interior Design #81
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
consent of principal if on telemedia
Academic Standard(s):
none

Each of you will soon be establishing your own homes. Find out how to furnish & maintain your living space. We will study furniture arrangement, lighting, color schemes, floor and wall covering, wall arrangements, etc.


INTERIOR DESIGN
Textbook  Housing Decisions by Evelyn Lewis & Carolyn Turner
We will cover the following chapters in this textbook:
Chapter 4  Choosing A Place To Live (briefly)
Chapter 6  The Evolution of Exteriors (briefly)
Chapter 7  Understanding House Plans
Chapter 10  The Elements of Design
Chapter 11  Using Color Effectively
Chapter 12  Using the Principles of Design
Chapter 14  Creating Interior Backgrounds
Chapter 15  Furniture Styles and Construction (briefly)
Chapter 16  Arranging and Selecting Furniture
Chapter 17  Addressing Windows, Lighting and Accessories
Chapter 21  Maintaining Your Home
Chapter 22  Housing for Tomorrow
Chapter 23  Careers in Housing

Please bring notebook, pen or pencil, folder and textbook to class each day. You may keep classroom supplies in the drawers under the windows if you wish. Food and beverages (except water) are not allowed in class at any time (that includes suckers and candy). You may chew gum, but only if you can chew it quietly and no bubble blowing. Sit only on chairs, not on tables or counters. Chairs may not be used as foot rests and heads should not rest on the tables. If you are late for class, you must have a late pass from the office. Late assignments will be graded according to how late they are. If you miss class, you will be given 1 day to make up the work. Please come to this class prepared to work!!


Daily Grading: Attendance and participation. 3 points per day.


Grading Scale
A 95-100 C- 74-76
A- 92-94 D+ 71-73
B+ 89-91 D 68-70
B 86-88 D- 65-67
B- 83-85 F 64 & below
C+ 80-82
C 77-79

 

IntroFACS #74
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
9
Required:
partially fulfills vocational requirements
Prerequisites:
none
Academic Standard(s):
Technical Applications

This course includes foods and nutrition and sewing. Foods and nutrition will include preparation of quick breads, yeast breads and a dessert lab. Students will construct a Quillow (quilt-pillow).


Topics of Study

Sewing Basics & Sewing Project

Nutrition (if time allows)

Classroom Procedures
1. Be on time to class; if you are late bring a pass from the office.
2. Bring all items with you to class. Book, notebook, pen or pencil.
3. No food or pop in the classroom (you may have water); this also includes candy. On days that there are food labs you may bring something other than water to drink.
4. Sit on chairs not the tables or counters. Chairs are not to be used as footrests and heads should not rest on the table.
5. Follow directions and do your own work.
6. Your attention is expected when the teacher is talking or a classmate is speaking.
7. Raise your hand to speak in class.
8. If you know you are going to be absent, take care of your work ahead of time. YOU are responsible for getting the makeup work. You will be given 1 day to make up work.
9. All assignments are due at the beginning of the hour unless you are told differently.
10. Late assignments will be docked 10% each day they are late.

Daily Grading: Attendance and Participation. 3 points per day.

Grading:
A 95-100 B- 83-85 D+ 71-73
A- 92-94 C+ 80-82 D 68-70
B+ 89-91 C 77-79 D- 65-67
B 86-88 C- 74-76 F 64 and below

 

Leisure Arts #77
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
none
Academic Standard(s):
none

Do you want to learn new hobbies to fill your leisure time? In this class you may choose your projects to complete. Projects could include but are not limited to: cross-stitch,latch hook,tie dye,jewelry making,origami,cake decorating,fleece projects,card making,wood burning,glass etching or others that interest you.

Objectives:
1. The student will choose hobbies that they would like to learn to make.
2. The student may teach others in the class a hobby/art that they know.
3. The student will utilize a range of hobbies/arts.
4. The student will develop problem-solving skills while learning a new hobby/art.
5. The student will reflect, revise and refine work in problem solving and critical thinking.


Possible Hobbies/Arts:

Cross-stitch
Latch Hook
Tie Dye
Jewelry Making
Cake Decorating
Origami
Fleece Projects
Card Making
Wood Burning
Glass Etching
Drawing
Painting
Calligraphy
Knitting


Grading:
A 95-100 B- 83-85 D+ 71-73
A- 92-94 C+ 80-82 D 68-70
B+ 89-91 C 77-79 D- 65-67
B 86-88 C- 74-76 F 64 and below

 

Nutrition, Exercise, and You #342
Credits:
.5
Grade:
9-12
Required:
Prerequisites:
Academic Standard(s):

Get fit, eat fit and be fit! This course will guide students through the questions and myths of specific nutrients such as water, carbohydrates, protein, fat, vitamins, and minerals. Other topics covered in this course are: body fat composition, pre-game and post-game meals, fast foods, steroids, carbohydrate loading, sports drinks, caffeine exercise recommendations, and eating disorders. Contemporary nutrition topics relevant to today's teens will be explored through independent research, group work and hands-on activities. Students will have a unique opportunity to apply their learning through in-class food preparation and evaluation. Self-assessment and monitoring of personal nutrition and fitness status is an integral part of this course.

Objectives:
1. The student will explore wellness and healthy lifestyles.
2. The student will complete a personal fitness assessment.
3. The student will complete a personal diet analysis.
4. The student will develop and implement a personal fitness program.
5. The student will plan and prepare nutritional foods.
6. The student will complete a paper on what they have learned in this class and why it is important in life.


NUTRITION, EXERCISE AND YOU  Textbook: Food, Nutrition & Wellness

Chapters covered in the text:

Chapter 1  Wellness and Food Choices
Chapter 2  Physical Fitness and Active Living
Chapter 7  Nutrients: From Food to You
Chapter 8  Dietary Guidelines
Chapter 9  My Pyramid and You
Chapter 10  Choices for Your Healthy Weight
Chapter 11  Fuel Up for Sports
Chapter 14  Special Health Concerns
Chapter 16  Planning Nutritious Meals and Snacks


Other topics covered not in the book:

Body Fat Composition
Steroids
Carbohydrate Loading
Sports Drinks

Grading:
A 95-100 B- 83-85 D+ 71-73
A- 92-94 C+ 80-82 D 68-70
B+ 89-91 C 77-79 D- 65-67
B 86-88 C- 74-76 F 64 and below

 

Science of Food #82
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
none
Academic Standard(s):
none

Don't let the title fool you; this is not a science class. We will be making and eating many foods. Some of the experiments include making cakes with several different types of fat, how to keep fruits from turning brown, different ways to tenderize steak and making ice cream with different variables.

Objectives:
1. The student will learn the importance of correct measuring techniques.
2. The student will understand how to run an experiment using variables and controls.
3. The student will understand how cooking and baking times affect the quality of food.
4. The student will learn how to draw conclusions from food experiments.


THE SCIENCE OF FOOD
Textbooks  Exploring Science in the Foods Lab by Carol Byrd-Bredbenner
Guide to Good Food by Velda Largen and Deborah Bence

Topics of Study:

Your Sensational Senses
Kitchen Equipment
Microwave Cooking
Baked Goods and Cereals
Fruits, Vegetables and Salads
Milk and Dairy Products
Meats
Fats and Sweets
Food Storage and Safety


Grading:
A 95-100 B- 83-85 D+ 71-73
A- 92-94 C+ 80-82 D 68-70
B+ 89-91 C 77-79 D- 65-67
B 86-88 C- 74-76 F 64 and below

 

World of Foods #79
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Foods I
Academic Standard(s):
none

We will study the food customs of many countries around the world and prepare foods from these countries. Some of the countries we will study include France, Germany, Italy, Scandinavian countries, Japan, China, Spain and Mexico.

Objectives:
1. The student will gain an understanding of food customs around the world.
2. The student will understand and practice kitchen and food safety.
3. The student will be able to read, understand and prepare a recipe.
4. The student will be able to work cooperatively in a kitchen group.


WORLD OF FOODS  Textbook: Guide to Good Food by Largen & Bence

We will cover the following chapters in this textbook:

Chapter 5  Safeguarding the Familys Health
Chapter 9  Kitchen Utensils
Chapter 12  Getting Started in the Kitchen
Chapter 27  Latin America
1. Mexico
2. South America
Chapter 28  Europe
1. British Isles
2. France
3. Germany
4. Scandinavia
Chapter 29  Mediterranean Countries
1. Spain
2. Italy
3. Greece
Chapter 31  Asia
1. Russia
2. India
3. China
4. Japan

Grading:
A 95-100 B- 83-85 D+ 71-73
A- 92-94 C+ 80-82 D 68-70
B+ 89-91 C 77-79 D- 65-67
B 86-88 C- 74-76 F 64 and below

 

Fifth Grade
Fine Arts
Westbrook Walnut Grove Schools place a strong emphasis on the Fine Arts. We encourage students to become involved in both school courses and extracurricular activities. We have a strong Music Department that consistently rates well in large and small group contest and plays to appreciative audiences at their three yearly concerts. The media arts efforts produce short videos and have hosted video professionals to work with students during the year. In the theatre arena there are two to three classes each year in drama and between three and five productions each year including One Act Play Competition and original pieces. In Visual Arts, there is a variety of courses that includes sculpture, painting, drawing, regular and digital photography and computer graphics. In May for the past few years, we have hosted the Region III A Visual Arts Festival in Westbrook. In addition, we host an annual choir festival in October, a Prairie Winds Fine Arts Festival in November and work with the Perpich Center for Arts Education to assist students from the region in developing their artistic potential. Several of the staff have participated in specialized art training through the Best Practices Network , the Dance Education Initiative and Theater Production Seminars.

Carolyn Enstad, Luke Nelson, Tina Anderson Richards and Tasha Nelson are the WWG High School Fine Arts Faculty
Art 7 #472
Credits:
Grade:
seventh
Required:
Prerequisites:
elementary art
Academic Standard(s):
none

7th Grade Art
7th grade art Quarter 1, Block 5-6
Tina Anderson Richards
507-859-2713
richardstfac@westbrook.mntm.org


Classroom guidelines:
 You are an artist
 Respect the work of others
 Be proud of what you do
 Put tools away
 Clean up after you, I dont like to
 No gum chewing, sometimes pop, drink water, hats ?
 Dont steal! It is a pain we when we dont have the right tools to work with.
 Come prepared-pencil, and art topics book and an open mind.
 Best policy is to do unto others, as you would have them do to you. Be kind and respectful.

Cell phones: If they are used or seen the phone can be taken away and a parent and the student have to pick it up in the office
Do not call a parent or have a parent call you- if contact is needed use the office!! Does a hair cut qualify-no?

Tardies and missing class: Students you are expected to show up for class. Do not have a problem with this. Each day a student has the ability to receive 4 points, their behavior and their work time determines how much they may loose in a day. The hard part is school-sponsored event. The
Student must talk to me to make up the time missed if it is not competed the student will loose 1 participation point for that day. My classs is very hands on and I do group work and individual work.

Clothing: You need to follow the dress code; I will try to correct any distracting clothes.

The student maybe sent to the office and home for a change of clothes. Boys I dont want or need to see your underwear and boxers are underwear. Girls your bra straps are undergarments keep them covered. I dont want to see cleavage- it is too distracting along with very short shorts. Shirts with improper language and logos will be turned inside out or exchanged. This is a school not everyday clothes.


Improper language: I have a 3 strike policy- 3 bad words in a class time and the student will receive 1 hour of detention. Many students use a language out of school that is not right or appropriate for school.

Points per day: 4 points per day-discussed in missing class. Each student walks into the classroom with 4 points, their behavior and work habits can take points away they will always keep 1 point for being in the room bodily.


Please keep a water bottle with you. You need the water more then the pop.




Grade cutoffs
A+ ---- 98
A ---- 95
A- --- 92
B+ --- 89
B ---- 86
B- ---- 83
C+ ----80
C -----77
C- ----74
D+ ----71
D -----68
F ------65
You are not allowed any 0s in the grade book. Only exception is if the assignment is a walk in the door work done. Then you will receive a 0 and not be able to make it up.

The 7th grade art program has been designed to fit in with the Minnesota standard for 6-8th grade art education.

You will be studying Art from cave art (15,000 B.C.) to the Renaissance (1500) period.
Included: Egyptian, Minoan, Greek, Roman, Chinese Byzantine, Mayan, Romanesque, Gothic (this is mostly cathedrals)
These studies will lead you through work with pencils, painting, mosaics, clay, color pencils, oil pastels, paper, college, printmaking and sculpture.


You will study the elements and principles of art:
Elements: Line, color, shape, space, form, pattern, and value
Principles: texture, movement, rhythm, unity, contrast, balance, and repetition

Students will make their own drawing book. It is designed for your work. Dont loose this book it will hold your assignments and notes.

There will be homework assigned and tests.

You will be studying these things. The question is what will you take away from the class?
 More confidence in your work?
 Work habits?
 An understanding of how art and history affect each other?
 An ability to articulate about your work?
 Problem solving?
 Finishing what you started?
 Knowing your classmates better?
 Becoming a more caring person?



 

Art 8A #474
Credits:
Grade:
Required:
Prerequisites:
Academic Standard(s):

 

Art 8B #475
Credits:
Grade:
Required:
Prerequisites:
Academic Standard(s):

 

Art Design #59
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Required:
fulfills Fine Arts requirement
Prerequisites:
Jr. High Art
Academic Standard(s):
Literature & Arts Create/Perform & History of the Arts

Design is the structure of art . The elements and principles unify the different parts and give visual order.
Design is apart of all our lives. It is the clothes you wear and how you where them. The car you drive. How you wear your hair.
I will help students learn each element and principle of art through note taking, drawing, painting, clay and other artist techniques. It is a hands on class with time to do and think about what you are doing.



Design is everywhere - and that is why looking for a definition may not help you grasp what it is.


Design 2011-2012
Tina Anderson Richards
507-859-2713
richardstfac@westbrook.mntm.org



Classroom guidelines: You are an artist!
Respect the work of others
Be proud of what you do
Put tools away
Clean up after yourself
Dont steal!
Stay seated until the bell rings  1 point off per day

No cell phones. I will take them away
Swearing policy. 3 times in one day equals 1 hour of detention.

Walking out of class early, letting your anger hurt others, not using the seating chart, not working, not listening, to much talking, studying for other classes when you have work in here to do, or disappearing from school, you will be assigned 1 hour of detention. Or as defined by the school policy.

The best policy is to do unto others, as you would have them do to you. Be kind and respectful.

Your notebook becomes your textbook.

Pencil required

Please bring a class fee of 5.00 to meet the needs of part of your supplies, and your drawing book.

Dress code enforced.


Design is the structure of art, with the elements and principles unifying the different parts and giving the work visual order.
Design is part of all our lives. It is part of the clothes you buy and how you wear them. It is about the car you choose to drive. It is about the shoes you wear. How you wear your hair.




De-sign, verb, transitive
1. To plan out in systematic, usually graphic form: design a building; design a computer program.
2. To create or execute in an artistic or highly skilled manner.

Verb, intransitive
1. To create designs.

Noun
1. a. A drawing or sketch. b. A graphic representation, especially a detailed plan for construction or manufacture.
2. The purposeful or inventive arrangement of parts or details: the aerodynamic design of an automobile: furniture of simple but elegant design,
3. The art or practice of designing or making designs
4. Something designed, especially a decorative or an artistic work.
5. An ornamental pattern. See synonyms at figure.


Design is everywhere  and that is why looking for a definition may not help you grasp what it is.



Each element or principle has assignments. 1- will be a masters work . 2- will be a cartoon like piece. Note taking is worth 5 points.

Each week the student will turn in a weekly drawing. You are to spend 2 hours or more on this drawing. 20 points. Due the Friday of every week.

In addition we will do actual design problems you will experience on the job.






Elements:


Line:
Definition- from point to point, concept mapping of line,

Assignment 1-
Assignment 2-


Shape:
Definition -

Assignment 3
Assignment 4


Form:
Definition-

Assignment 5
Assignment 6


Color:
Definition-

Assignment -7
Assignment-8


Value:
Definition-

Assignment 9
Assignment 10

Texture:
Definition-

Assignment 11
Assignment 12

Space:
Definition-

Assignment 13
Assignment 14






Principles:

Balance:
Definition-

Assignment 15
Assignment 16


Movement:
Definition-

Assignment 17
Assignment 18

Rhythm:
Definition-

Assignment 19
Assignment 20

Contrast:
Definition-

Assignment 21
Assignment 22

Emphasis:
Definition-

Assignment 23
Assignment 24

Pattern:
Definition-

Assignment 25
Assignment 26




Unity:
Definition-

Assignment 27
Assignment 28



Projects- as assigned

1. _______ Done - DESIGN word


2. _______ Done  Glue Drawing


3. ________Done - Collage


4. ________Done  Clay


5. ________Done  Pie Piece



6. ________Done  Flat Pack Toy



7. _______Done  Box that flows around the cube



8. _______Done


Final - 10% OF YOUR GRADE- LAST WEEK OF THE QUARTER
Tests as given.


Grading policy: students are expected to show up for class and use their time wisely. 20% of your grade is attendance and participation, 4 points for each day, 1 point each day for showing up and 3 point for participation and not acting out. A school field trip will give you the 1 attendance point but not the participation point.
All missed days maybe helped or made up by speaking to the instructor.

Attendance points will be tallied weekly so you may know where you stand.

You will receive 3 grades or more each week.

You may have only 2 0s in the grade book. If you have 3 0s your grade will be an F no matter what your percentage is. This is based on 1 week to do make up work. Grades due every Wednesday.

Grade cutoffs

A ---- 95 - 100
A- --- 92 - 94
B+ --- 89 - 91
B ---- 86 - 88
B- ---- 83 - 85
C+ ----80 - 82
C -----77 - 79
C- ----74 - 76
D+ ----71 - 73
D -----68 - 70
D- ------65 - 67
F ------00  64

At the end of a quarter you will receive an F not an I.


If you need help, we will decide on a day and time, after school or before school. If you dish me 3 times I no longer have a responsibily to teach you make up work.

 

Art Topics #64
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Required:
elective`
Prerequisites:
Art Design
Academic Standard(s):
Literature & Arts Create/Perform & History of the Arts

selected art topics that are arranged around areas I am not able to add to other classes. subjects include, mask making, ukraian easter eggs, Mola, an art from central america, book art, cave art clay techniques in the style and time of an art peroid. The goal is to spend 1 week on each subject covered.

Art topics:

Creating book:
1. History of books
2. Think about your book and using elements and principles of art explain your book.
3. Add a new ? to your book

Mask Making:
1. why would people make a mask?
2. name 3 materials masks can be made from?

Cave Art:
1. 17000 BCE
2. what colors
3. why?
4. what kind of animals and why?

Clay vase:
1. slab work

Weaving:
1. fiber arts
2. spinning
3. warp
4. weft
5. shuttle

 

Desktop Publishing #30
Credits:
Grade:
Required:
Prerequisites:
Academic Standard(s):

 

Drawing & Painting #60
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Art Design
Academic Standard(s):
Literature & Arts Create/Perform & History of the Arts

Projects will use drawing to explore elements of art such as shading, color, value, design and perspective. Further exploration of these elements will be done through painting. Grade A, B, F.

 

Fine Arts Overview #72
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Consent of instructor
Academic Standard(s):
History of the Arts

An overview of arts careers, applications and insights gained through the fine arts of music, dance, theatre, literary arts, visual arts, and media arts. Course will include demonstrations, guest speakers, field trips and use of the fine arts in the fulfillment of course requirements for other courses. [possible TELEMEDIA and Arts Partners Program]

 

Guided Art Instruction #62
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Any high school art course
Academic Standard(s):
Literature & Arts Create/Perform & History of the Arts

Designed for students who would like to further explore interest areas in the Arts. Teacher and student develop an individual plan and goals to be accomplished. Student must be self motivated. Grade A, B, C, D, F.

 

Music Theory #73
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
consent of principal
Academic Standard(s):
Literature & Arts Analysis & Interpretation

Study and explain music phenomena such as acoustics, scales, intervals, etc. Also study of notation, part writing, harmonic analysis, sight singing, ear training, counterpoint, form analysis and orchestration. Designed for students interested in a music career. [TELEMEDIA]

 

Photography #61
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Art Design
Academic Standard(s):
Literature & Arts Create/Perform, History of the Arts & Literature & Arts Analysis & Interpretatio

Explores photography as an art form using cameras and darkroom. Grade A, B, C,D, or fail. The students will learn the elements and principles of art. This is to help them frame and produce the best photos they can. As technology has changed i have moved to all digital work for the students. They use the photoshop program to work on their photos. This allows for the teaching of photoshop techniques.




Snapshot vs. Photograph for Art


Photography Quarter 1 2010-2011
Tina Anderson Richards
507-859-2713
richardstfac@westbrook.mntm.org


Classroom guidelines: You are an artist!
Respect the work of others
Be proud of what you do
Put tools away
Clean up after yourself, I dont like to
Dont steal!
Return cameras in a timely manner
No gum, food or drink in the lab

Students: You must have a 3-ring notebook; the notebook will be graded at the end of the quarter. I have the paper and most other supplies you will need. This is an expensive class so the school is asking for a 10-dollar fee from you.

If you have a license and vehicle you will be allowed to drive at certain times. Those who dont have this will be passengers. I need a note from home that says you are allowed to drive or ride during photography class only.

Photography is an art form that at its earliest developed around 500 AD in China with the camera obscure. Black and white photography hit a more usable form in the 1880s.

This is an all-digital photography class.

What I am looking for in good photographs- elements and principles of art.


Goal:
1. To create an environment where students have an opportunity to explore the area of photography.
2. Work with expensive and less expensive cameras.
3. Create and learn new tools in Photoshop.
4. Explore professional photography.


Paper on an Artist you like
- First a small 1 page paper to include an image of the artists work and a paragraph on why you like this work, due the 3rd week of the quarter. I will give you a research sheet to fill out.

- Use creative language. The paper will have a title page, body include a work of each artist, a critical analysis of the work and a closing and a reference page. A total of 5 pages. You can do this from Internet sources. (at least 2 sources)
The paper should include 2 images of the artists work; do not use full-page photos. Title page has 4 lines, 1.class name, and 2. Name of artist being studied, 3. Date, 4. Your name, this is centered on the first page. Again the body of the paper 3 pages will contain a life story of the artist, their work and a critical analysis of why you like their work. Page 5 is your reference page; you must have 2 or more references. Good web site to start on is (masters-of-photography.com) this site has photos, articles and a bibliography. This is due the week after midterms

.

Any cooperative work? We will think about, is their a class you want to work with in photography such as a particular grade, or a history class or come sort of building or mechanics class.

You will learn to cut mats for any type of picture and do one for yourself.

Can you do this on your own? If I was not in the room or you had a sub can you do the work? I need each one of you to be able to.

We will do individual and or group critiques as we go along.



Elements of Art:
1. Line
2. Shape:
3. Texture:
4. Space:
5. Value:
6. Color
7. Form:


Principles of art;

1.Rhythm / Repetition
2.Movement:
3.Balance:
4. Emphasis
5. Contrast
6: Pattern
7. Unity:



Assignments: these will be in handouts
 Still life
 Close up
 Emotions
 Nature
 Tutorials
 Exploring Photoshop
 Paper
 Final



Photo 2 students
Assignment1: Do first photo assignment with class



Grading:

Students are expected to show up for class and use their time wisely. Therefore 20 percent of their grade is attendance. 2 points for each day, 1 point for attendance and 1 point for participation. Students are not penalized for attendance on school sponsored trips, they will loose a participation point, this point can be made up(talk to me).

Grade cutoffs
A+ ---- 98
A ---- 95
A- --- 92
B+ --- 89
B ---- 86
B- ---- 83
C+ ----80
C -----77
C- ----74
D+ ----71
D -----68
F ------65

The student will be allowed 2 0s in the grade book. 1 week late is an F.

NOTES and other things:

 

Prints #63
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
none
Academic Standard(s):
Literature & Arts Create/Perform & History of the Arts

Students will explore a variety of print making technique including lino,serigraph, intaglio prints, screenprinting. Students will also study the works of great printmakers. The students will work in the media of relief printing ,intaglio. Printing is a means of making hand made multiples of an orginal image. the final fro each print will be graded on the image, carving techniques, and the run of an edition.






Tina Anderson Richards
Westbrook Walnut Grove Schools
Quarter 1, 2010-2011
richardstfac@westbrook.mntm.org
507-859-2713

Classroom guidelines:
 You are an artist
 Please do not steal from classroom
 Use tools and put them away
 Clean tools of ink and put them in their place
 When I am talking, you need to listen and take notes
 It will be help full to know elements and principles of art. Mostly line, contract and value.
 No gum chewing.


No cell phone use. See classroom rules.
Wear appropriate school clothing. See school handbook.
Come prepared for class. Like a pencil and tools and plates you may have taken home.

Goal:
1. To explore the world of printmaking.
2. Learn the types of printmaking.
3. Create a body of successful prints.
4. Find some success as a printmaker.
5. Use problem-solving skills.
6. Be critical about your work and to write about your work.
7. Know how to display a print.


What is Printmaking; notes from teacher to students.


Types of prints:
1. Relief

2. Intaglio

3. Plano graphic

4. Silkscreen

View of prints from other students as examples fro each unit

Power points- elements
- Prints to view
- Elizabeth Catlett
- Rembrandt
- Modern print artist
- How their paper will look
- Others

Projects:

Staple together a book to use for notes.

1. Mono print  faces from potato _________10 points
Animal from vegetables __________20 points
2. 4-x6 print of a flower. Because this is fall I could have them work from nature.

 Cut out 4 flowers from the magazines; glue them in your book.
 Trace your soft 4x6 inch block 2 times in your notebook.
 Draw two of the 4 flowers on to the traced 2 rectangles
 Now choose the best one
 Turn the paper over on the block and rub the back until the images has transferred.
 Redraw the image as needed so you can see what you have.
 After demonstration the student will begin carving.
 The student will create artist proof as they go along.
 When a final is ready an edition of 6 prints will be pulled. The prints are to be as alike as possible and printed with black ink on white paper, traditional print technique.
 Assessment- __________20 points choice of print
__________10 points knowledge of transfer and carving
___________20 points carving discipline
__________30 points final edition quality and artist quality
__________80 total points



3. 9 x 12 print on class, oppression and other issues related.


***** The students will a portrait drawing, 8 x 10, chosen from the box, after using pencil, they will need to use a fine tipped marker to show complete black and white.
******Assessment ________40 points, looking for drawing skills and contrast.


 The students will view a power point of the life and work of Elizabeth Catlett.
 The teacher will read the book  Lift every voice and sing  the words to the song are used with the prints of Elizabeth Catlett.
 The book and prints are a starting point for discussion on social issues; this discussion is to lead the student into thought on a print they can create.
 Narrow down ideas to one that the can they can print.
 Trace the block.
 Do the drawing for the print, transfer the drawing to the block, carve, proof and have a final ready to print.
 Print an edition of 8 prints that are as exactly alike as possible.
 Assessment- _____________20 points choice of print
_____________20 points carving discipline
_____________20 points quality of print
_____________40 points quality of the edition and artist quality and merit.
_____________100 total points

4. 6 x6 inch print
 The students will use the childrens book section of the library. They will choose a childrens book that a print can be created from.
 From the library choose at least 2 children books you could create a print from.
 Make a critical decision of which book and image from that book. Okay it with the teacher.
 Trace the block twice. Draw the image and color it in with color pencils, now draw the image you are going to create the print of.
 Transfer and carve your block.
 Print an edition in color this time with an edition of 6 prints.
 Assessment- ___________20 points choice of print and rendering of drawing
___________10 points for discipline
___________10 points for carving quality
___________20 points for quality of the edition and artist quality
___________60 points total


6. The students will move to a harder lino block to carve into, it will be a smaller battleship block.
Steps:
 The students will first view animal prints and animal pictures to see possibilities.
 Review animal possibilities
 Trace their block, draw at least 2 different animals, and on the traced block choose one.
 Transfer drawing, carve and print an edition of 10. Print this time on colored paper.
 Assessment - ___________20 points for choice of animal and drawing
___________20 points for discipline in work, not shortchanging your work because of the difficult material.
___________30 points for the edition, this is a larger edition to print. Artist quality of the print.
___________70 points total

7. The students will carve in a block of wood. Wood has a grain they now have to work with.
Steps:
 The teacher will instruct in the two types of woodcarving, endgrain and grain, we will look at woods and what is possible.
 The goal will be to carve an 8-x10 wood block. The print needs to be an outdoor image; this can be rural or urban. It will be hand colored, each the same way, by the student. Coloring can be with colored pencils or watercolors. Edition of 5.

 As cement - _________ 20 points for the choice of print possible in wood block carving.
_________ 20 points for carving discipline and control of the material.
__________ 20 points for quality of the block
__________20 points for the quality of the whole colored edition and artist quality of the print.
__________80 points total


8. The students will work in the area of silkscreen.
9. The student will create an intaglio print on plastic with an edition of 4 prints.
10. We move into silkscreen given the time or intaglio. Lessons will come as the projects do.


11. Grading:

a. Students are expected to show up for class and use their time wisely. Therefore 20 percent of their grade is attendance. 2 points for each day, 1 point for attendance and 1 point for participation. Students are not penalized for attendance on school sponsored trips, they will loose a particapation point, which can be made up (you must talk to me about how to do this).

Grade cutoffs
A+ ---- 98
A ---- 95
A- --- 92
B+ --- 89
B ---- 86
B- ---- 83
C+ ----80
C -----77
C- ----74
D+ ----71
D -----68
F ------65

The student is allowed 2 0s in the grade book. 1 week late is an F.

 

Sculpture Crafts #65
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Art Design
Academic Standard(s):
Literature & Arts Create/Perform & History of the Arts

Projects using creativity in various sculpture techniques which may include clay, weaving, wood, plaster and other media. . Grad Standard: Literary Arts Create/Perform & History of the Arts. This is a class that works on 3 dimentional projects. We look at a piece of work from all directions. We will work in both subractive and an additive methods. The students will do an indepth look at the life and work of one sculptor. Student work will be displayed.

 

Senior High Band #68
Credits:
1.0/yr
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Required:
fulfills Fine Arts requirement
Prerequisites:
prefer lessons or Middle School Band
Academic Standard(s):
Literary Arts Create/Perform

Large group designed to perform music concerts and contests. Music will be of moderate to difficult level with variation in style and taste. Students will participate in contests and parades. Jazz Band and pep band opportunities.

 

Senior High Choir #70
Credits:
1.0/yr
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Required:
fulfills Fine Arts requirement
Prerequisites:
none
Academic Standard(s):
Literary Arts Create/Perform

Senior High Choir participation includes performing in four concerts and one large group contest. Skills that are emphasized include voice skills, music reading and theory, and music analysis, and listening analysis. Grade Standard: "Literary and Arts Creation and Performance" is interwoven into the curriculum. Students may participate in Dynamic Sound, as well as small ensembles, solo work, and voice lessons. We also work to involve interested students in singing opportunities beyond our school. This includes select choirs, events such as the Dorian Festival at Luther, workshops such as the Barbershop event at Jackson among others.

 

Industrial Technology
Advanced Mechanical Drafting #93
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
consent of principal
Academic Standard(s):
none

 

Advanced Woods #88
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Intro Shop
Academic Standard(s):
none

Design and plan application of advanced procedures for completion of a major wood project.

 

Building Trades #92
Credits:
0.5 - 1 varies
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Shop 9
Academic Standard(s):
Technical Applications, Occupational Experience

Provide students with a working understanding of the different fields and areas of employment available in the building trades. Some lecture. A lot of "hands on" experience. ( AVAILABLE IN 2005 - 2006)

 

Computer Assisted Drafting #87
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
electives
Prerequisites:
consent of principal
Academic Standard(s):
Technical language

The students will learn how to use the computer program Intellicad 2000 efficiently. They will learn how to do mechanical and architectural drafting using the computer. The students will be able to design their own house. They will also find and object and improve it some way then make a set of drawings for it.

 

Electricity #89
Credits:
.5
Grade:
10-12
Required:
No
Prerequisites:
a
Academic Standard(s):
b

This class is designed to provide students with some basic elecrticity and practical wiring experience. This class is a mixture of inclass and lab work. The class will explore where electricity comes from, parallel and series circuits, measuring electrical power and costs, switching for elecrtical circuits, grounding for safety, and Transmission and distibution of electricity.
The lab portion will encompase the wiring of two-way, three-way, and four-way switches, outlets, extention cords, and lamps. A fun and practical class to teach the saftey around electricity.

 

Electronics #89
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Algebra I
Academic Standard(s):
Technical Applications

Basic electronic theory and lab work with simple circuits, diodes, resistors, transistors and capacitors.

 

Graphic Design #378
Credits:
Grade:
Required:
Prerequisites:
Academic Standard(s):

 

Home Repair & Maintenance #90
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
none
Academic Standard(s):
Technical Applications

Learn the basics of home maintenance including basic electricity, plumbing, weather proofing, painting, and simple carpentry, appliance and furniture repair.

 

Intro Shop #85
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Required:
partially fulfills vocational requirement
Prerequisites:
none
Academic Standard(s):
Technical Applications

Safe use and set up every power machine in the Industrial Arts Lab. Use plans and reading to direct construction of a wood project with power tools.

 

Metal Technology #91
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
none
Academic Standard(s):
Technical Applications

Introduces students to the working knowledge of metals - selection and repair. Students will learn arc and oxy acetylene welding, cutting, and brazing.

 

Library
Mathematics
Junior high math courses are Math 7 and Math 8 (which is the first half of Algebra 1)

High school math courses that are offered are Algebra 2, Geometry, Algebra 3, College Algebra, and College Precalculus.

Three credits in math are required for graduation at WWG. We recommend students take Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2, in that order and complete the courses by the end of their junior year. In the spring of their junior year, students take the MCA II Math test, of which a passing score is required for graduation.

College Algebra and College Trig/Special Functions are offered at WWG, and credits are earned at Southwest Minnesota State University, Marshall, Minnesota. These courses are offered for both high school and college credit.

Sheryl Woelber and Mandy Dibble are the mathematics teachers at the high school.
Algebra 2 #99
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Required:
partially fulfills math requirement for graduation
Prerequisites:
Math 8 (Algebra 1)
Academic Standard(s):
Discrete Math Functions & Math Research

Introduces students to variable solutions and prepares them for advanced studies in math, science and business.

 

Algebra 3 #100
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Algebra 2 and Geometry
Academic Standard(s):
Algebraic patterns

An advanced math course which will help students connect math to physics, chemistry, genetics, business as well as other math and non-math fields.

 

Applied Math #102
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Pre-algebra
Academic Standard(s):
Personal and Family Resource Management

Course designed to help students use mathematics in business applications for both personal needs and small business. Basic math review and applications to the real world are used.

 

Calculus #106
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Pre-calculus and principal consent
Academic Standard(s):
none

Formal calculus beginning with a visual intuitive introduction to limits, progressing into differentiation, integration, and transcendental functions with practical applications. [possible TELEMEDIA]

 

College Algebra #228
Credits:
3 College Credits at SMSU
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Passing grades in Algebra 1,2,3, and Geometry
Academic Standard(s):

This class is offered for both high school and college credit. If a student is taking the class for college credit, a junior must be in the top third of his class, and a senior must be in the top half of his class.

This class covers the following topics: Fundamental Topics; Equations and Inequalities; Functions and Graphs; Polynomial and Rational Functions; Inverse, Exponential, and Logarithmic Functions; and Systems of Equations and Inequalities

 

Geometry #101
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Algebra I
Academic Standard(s):
Shape & Space & Measurement

Beginning with a basic understanding of the terms point, line and plane. Students will logically develop and study the system of plane geometry, proving theorems, and applying them to triangles, circles, and polygons.

 

Pre-Calculus #104
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Geometry & Algebra II or consent
Academic Standard(s):
none

Students will study areas of discrete mathematics including Probability, Matrices and Determinants, combinations, and Permutations and apply them to solve real life problems, ending with a basic Introduction to Calculus

 

Probability and Statistics #188
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
10,11,12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Algebra II
Academic Standard(s):

Course will cover statistics topics such as measures of central tendency, methods of displaying data, creating tables, charts, and graphs, and binomial and normal distributions. Probability topics covered are fundamental counting principal, permutations and combinations, and independent/dependent probabilities. Students will use Microsoft Excel and graphing calculators. Course will prepare students for college statistics.

 

Trigonometry #103
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Geometry and Algebra Two or consent of instructor
Academic Standard(s):
none

The student will learn about the six trigonometric functions, apply algebraic skills toward simplifying trigonometric expressions and equations, and use trigonometric functions in order to find distances and angles in triangulated measures.

 

Trigonometry and Special Functions #106
Credits:
1
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Algebra 3 and College Algebra
Academic Standard(s):

This course is offered in conjunction with Southwest State University in Marshall, Minnesota. Students will receive 1 high school credit and 3 college credits for the course. In order to receive college credit, a junior must be in the top third of his/her class, and a senior must be in the top half.

 

Physical Fitness
Health and Physical Education #112
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Required:
required
Prerequisites:
none
Academic Standard(s):
Physical Education & Fitness, & Individual & Comm. Health

To keep students informed of the new health developments based on knowledge gained in K-8 and help the students make informed decisions on health and life changing issues; to evaluate current fitness levels and establish and implement a personal fitness plan to meet specific, individual goals; to learn the rules and skills of team sports such as football, soccer, speedball, volleyball, basketball, softball, floor hockey; to learn the skills and rules of individual and dual activities such as golf, bowling, table tennis, badminton, gymnastics, rhythms, tennis and track.

Physical Education Health
Q1-Golf, Flag Football, Volleyball Nutrition, Eating Disorders, Conflict Resolution
Q2-Basketball, Bowling, Archery Physical Fitness, Stress, Skeletal System, Muscular System
Q3-Floor Hockey, Badminton, Table Tennis Tobacco, Alcohol, Safety Education
Q4-Soccer, Speedball, Softball Communicable Diseases, Non-communicable Diseases,
Safer Choices (sexual health education)

 

Pre-School
Pre-School #1000
Credits:
Grade:
Required:
Prerequisites:
Academic Standard(s):

 

Science
Advanced Biology #123
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Biology and Chemistry or Physical Science
Academic Standard(s):
none

Advance Biology is partly a review of Biology, but with all the finer details included. Students will cover many of the same topics as in Biology, but this time around they will cover the concepts in greater depth to gain a more comprehensive understanding. Topics of review include energy conversions in living organisms, heredity, cell structure and function, transcription and translation and natural selection. Topics that will be new to Advance Biology students include population genetics, Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium equations, biotechnology techniques, animal behavior and comparative vertebrate anatomy. As many of the concepts are review, students will be asked to demonstrate their understanding with project based assessments. For example, at the conclusion of cell organelles and function, students will create a cell parts order catalog. Upon completion of aerobic respiration, students will create a video project that compares another system to that of the mitochondria of the cell. It is a fast paced class, but most students find the projects to be enjoyable and challenging.

 

Advanced Chemistry #124
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Chemistry
Academic Standard(s):
none

CLASS SYLLABUS
GENERAL INFORMATION:
Teacher -- Mr. Patrick Merrick
Room -- 120 New building
length -- 1 semester
textbook -- CHEMISTRY, the central science

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course provides the learner with the opportunity to gain more knowledge about the chemical world. As this knowledge is gained, the learner will increase their appreciation of the structure and behavior of the world around you. As this knowledge is mastered, the learner will understand that humanity has a great opportunity and responsibility to appreciate the effect mixing a few chemicals together can have on the world and humanity.
Chemistry is also a study on the ability of think logically and to see connections in the information that is all around us. It also impresses friends and dates to no end. Trust me.

OUTCOMES and COURSE OBJECTIVES:
1. The learner will be able to understand the tools of chemistry
This includes the mathematical scales and relationships, as well as the theories about matter and energy.

2. The learner will master the basic structure of the atom and the composing forces of the molecule. This will include both the formation and rearrangement of inorganic matter, as well as the compositions of mixtures.

3. The learner will understand acids and bases and their importance in society.

4. The learner will be able to employ the knowledge gained in class to a laboratory setting.

5. The learner will be secure and mature enough to suggest and follow through with any other ideas on areas of chemistry that is of interest.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
1. attendance and participation -- Because of the school, students are required to attend class. Because of the teacher, students are required to participate in class. A/P will be graded each day by the following means: Attendance means being in your seat with the appropriate materials and staying in class all period. Participation means having your work completed and paying attention -- in other words attitude. ( smiles and waves are good bonuses)


2. Assignments and Labs -- This class will try and evolve into a project and discussion orientated class. (This means the more you talk the less I do.) Every section will contain a lab/project of some degree that will measure your mastery of the material. Assignment and labs will have time lines and due dates to follow for full credit.

3. Tests and quizzes-- they will be there, good luck?!

4. Grading -- All assignments and tests are graded on a point basis. Points are totaled at the end of each quarter to determine final grades. Grades are calculated on the following percentages:
91 - 100 % = A 82 - 90 % = B
73- 81 % = C 64- 72 % = D

GENERAL MUSINGS:
1. books When books are given out, go over them carefully and take care of them. I will expect it back in the same condition. You will be expected to read all chapters. Some questions on assignments will be from the book and not from class discussion.

2. labs I will try to have one lab a week (usually on Thursdays). These labs serve a twofold purpose, first they allow you to move around in the classroom and enjoy handson science. Second they are a great way to understand the concept. They are not a day off! Lab reports will be due on each lab and the quality of the answers will be judged.

3. needs You will need a notebook, writing utensil (no red or pink ), a calculator, and a folder for handouts, labs, etc.

4. Homework - is do on the date assigned. It is worth full points if handed in when asked for. It is worth 75% of possible if handed in before the next time we meet. It is worth 50% on third day and 0% after that. You will be expected to have everything necessary with you. You will not be allowed to go to your locker during class. I give out assignments because I feel that the information covered is valuable. Therefore, if you have 2 or more missing grades you will receive a failing grade for that midterm.

5. No hats or food are allowed in class unless a special situation arises.

6. The goal of this class is also to reinforce effort and responsibility. To this end, If an assignment or lab is turned in on time and at a perdetermined minimal level, it will be handed back for your corrections. If an assignment is a learning tool, then the first time the assignment is turned in should not be the last time you look at it. These corrections will be graded and can be recorrected again and again. It is my hope that we will keep working on the assignment until the concept is mastered.

 

Anatomy #126
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Biology and Chemistry or Physical Science
Academic Standard(s):
none

Anatomy will cover several different body systems, their anatomy and how they function. There are several different projects integrated into the chapters, some of which include a muscle infomercial for the muscular system, the construction of a functioning model for the sensory system, and a dietary plan for special needs in the digestive system. CPR and first aid instruction may be offered with the course.

 

Astronomy #125
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
1 prior science course
Academic Standard(s):
none

CLASS SYLLABUS
GENERAL INFORMATION:
Teacher -- Mr. Patrick Merrick
Room -- 120
length -- 1 credit
textbook -- Discovering the Universe Freeman publishing

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Few things inspire people as much as a star filled night sky. Humbling questions about our beginnings, our purpose and our fate race across our minds as we literally glance at infinity. This course provides the learner with the opportunity to gain more knowledge on the very structure of nature itself. As this knowledge is gained, the learner will increase their appreciation of the sky and all the treasures to be found there. Once this appreciation is instilled, the learner will be able to continued a lifelong journey through the heavens.
Astronomy is broken down into sections as we begin our journey. The first visit is to planet Earth and the tools of astronomy. As we venture outward, the solar system will be studied. After that, the stars and their properties will then be studied. Finally, we will looked at interstellar travel, both ours and others (?). Not only is this information interesting in life, it also will prepare you for the role as voters in decided if money and resources should be spent in the name of Astronomy. Finally, it impresses friends and dates to no end. Trust me.

OUTCOMES and COURSE OBJECTIVES:
1. The learner will be able to understand and use the scientific method in solving problems.
2. The learner will be able to see the connections between the earth and the other planets.
3. The learner will be able to understand the basics of stellar evolution.
4. The learner will be able to understand and the interaction of forces and their play in the construction of the universe.
6. The learner will be able to find and identify constellations.
7. The learner will be secure and mature enough to suggest and follow through with any other idea that is of interest.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
1. attendance and participation -- Because of the school , students are required to attend class. Because of the teacher, students are required to participate in class. A/P will be graded each day by the following means: Attendance means being in your seat with the appropriate materials and staying in class all period. Participation means having your work completed and paying attention; in other words attitude.
2. Assignments and Projects -- This class will try and evolve into a project and discussion orientated class. (This means the more you talk the less I do.) Most sections will contain a project of some degree that will measure your mastery of the material. Assignment and projects will have time lines and due dates to follow for full credit.

3. Tests and quizzes-- they will be there, good luck?!

4. Grading -- all assignments and tests are graded on a point basis. Points are totaled at the end of each quarter to determine final grades. Grades are calculated on the following percentages:
91 - 100 % = A 82 - 90% = B
73- 81 % = C 64- 72% = D

GENERAL MUSINGS:
1. books when books are given out, go over them carefully.
The books will be used as a resource and should be used as a guide in following the course, I expect them back in almost the same condition as they are now

2. Labs- We will be trying to do projects throughout the year. These are meant to supplement the discussion. They are not a rest time.

3. needs You will need a notebook, writing utensil (no red or pink ), a calculator, and a folder for handouts, labs, etc. These things plus your book should be brought everyday.

4. Homework - is do on the date assigned. It is worth full points if handed in when asked for. It is worth a maximum of 75% if handed in before the next time we meet. It is worth 50% on the second day, and 0% after that. You will be expected to have everything necessary with you. You will not be allowed to go to your locker during class. I give out assignments because I feel that the information covered is valuable. Therefore, if you have 2 or more missing grades you will receive a failing grade for that grading mid term.

5. No hats or food is allowed in class unless a special situation arises.

6. The goal of this class is also to reinforce effort and responsibility. To this end, If an assignment or lab is turned in on time and at a perdetermined minimal level, it will be handed back for your corrections. If an assignment is a learning tool, then the first time the assignment is turned in should not be the last time you look at it. These corrections will be graded and can be recorrected again and again. It is my hope that we will keep working on the assignment until the concept is mastered.

 

Biology #120
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
9
Required:
required
Prerequisites:
Science 8
Academic Standard(s):
Chance & Data Handling, Concepts in Biology

Biology students will be covering several basic biological concepts which include the characteristics of life, the structure and function of cells, genetics, natural selection, and comparative zoology. Students will also keep a portfolio of their work which they will turn in every two weeks for assessment.

 

Chemistry #121
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
either this course or Physical Science is required
Prerequisites:
Biology
Academic Standard(s):
Concepts in Chemistry & History of Science

CHEMISTRY
CLASS SYLLABUS
GENERAL INFORMATION:
Teacher -- Mr. Patrick Merrick Room -- 120 New Building
length -- 1 semester textbook -- CHEMISTRY

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course provides the learner with the opportunity to gain more knowledge on the very structure of nature itself. As this knowledge is gained, the learner will increase their appreciation of the structure and behavior of the world around them. Once this appreciation is instilled, the learner will be better equipped to evaluate the mass of science sound bites that are constantly being thrown at them in the name of public policy or advertising.
Chemistry is also a study on the ability of think logically and to see connections in the information that is all around us. Finally, it also impresses friends and dates to no end. Trust me.

OUTCOMES and COURSE OBJECTIVES:
1. The learner will be able to understand the tools of chemistry. This includes the mathematical scales and relationships, as well as the theories about matter and energy.

2. The learner will recognize the ability for science to both help and harm.
This will also include the ability for the learner to judge the benefits of proposed science and technology.

3. The learner will master the basic structure of the atom and the composing forces of the molecule. This will include the formation of both inorganic and organic matter, as well as the compositions of mixtures.

4. The learner will be able to employ the knowledge gained in class to a laboratory setting.

5. The learner will be secure and mature enough to suggest and follow through with any other ideas on areas of chemistry that is of interest.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
1. attendance and participation -- A/P will be graded each day by the following means: Attendance means being in your seat with the appropriate materials and staying in class all period. Participation means having your work completed and paying attention -- in other words attitude. ( smiles and waves are good bonuses)

2. Assignments and Labs -- This class will try and evolve into a project and discussion orientated class. (This means the more you talk the less I do.) Every section will contain a lab/project of some degree that will measure your mastery of the material. Assignments and labs will have time lines and due dates to follow for full credit.

3. Tests and quizzes-- they will be there, good luck?!

4. Grading -- All assignments and tests are graded on a point basis. Points are totaled at the end of each quarter to determine final grades. Grades are calculated on the following percentages:
91 - 100 %= A 82 - 90 %= B 73- 81 %= C 64- 72 %= D

GENERAL MUSINGS:
1. books  When books are given out, go over them carefully and take care of them. I will expect it back in the same condition. You will be expected to read all chapters. Some questions on assignments will be from the book and not from class discussion.

2. labs  I will try to have one lab a week (usually on Thursdays). These labs serve a twofold purpose, first they allow you to move around in the classroom and enjoy hands-on science. Second they are a great way to understand the concept. They are not a day off! Lab reports will be due on each lab and the quality of the answers will be judged.

3. needs  You will need a notebook, writing utensil (no red or pink ), a calculator, and a folder for handouts, labs, etc.

4. Homework - is do on the date assigned. It is worth full points if handed in when asked for. It is worth 75% of possible if handed in before the next time we meet. It is worth 50% on third day. It is worth 25% on the forth, etc. You will be expected to have everything necessary with you. You will not be allowed to go to your locker during class. I give out assignments because I feel that the information covered is valuable. Therefore, if you have 2 or more missing grades you will receive a failing grade for that midterm.

5. No hats or food are allowed in class unless a special situation arises.

6. The goal of this class is also to reinforce effort and responsibility. To this end, each assignment turned in on time and at a minimum level has the ability to be corrected. These corrections will be graded and returned. It is my hope that we will keep working on the assignment until the concept is mastered. Finally, most assignments will be handed back for your corrections. If an assignment is a learning tool, then the first time the assignment is turned in should not be the last time you look at it.

 

Environmental Science #118
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Biology
Academic Standard(s):
Concepts in Environmental Systems

This course will focus on environmental issues that include maintenance of biodiversity in an ecosystem, wetland restoration and preservation, global warming and water quality. When the course is offered in conjunction with Outdoor life, an interdisciplinary project involving the use of GPS and eutrophication of area lakes may be pursued.

 

Forensic Science 1 #158
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Physical science or Chemistry
Academic Standard(s):
none

Forensics is an exciting field of study, utilizing several scientific fields which include biology, chemistry, zoology, anatomy, genetics, physics, math and psychology, just to name a few. Students will be applying their critical thinking skills to solve various crimes, as well as learn the basic techniques used by forensic scientists to collect and analyze evidence. The information students learn during the course will be demonstrated during their final project in which they will process and document a crime scene. Toward the end of the the course, a field trip will be taken to the Sioux Falls Police Department to learn about the criminal processing side of the law. We will also visit Colorado Tech. in Sioux Falls for a presentation on forensics by an expert latent fingerprint examiner.

 

Forensic Science 2 #176
Credits:
.5
Grade:
11-12
Required:
Elective
Prerequisites:
Forensics I
Academic Standard(s):

Forensics II is a continuation of Forensics I, addressing various topics we are unable to cover in the first quarter. Our time together will focus on DNA and its role in solving forensic cases, forensic aspects of arson and explosives, firearms, document examination, and forensic entomology and anthropology. Forensic entomology will focus on insect succession in a pig carcass, giving students the opportunity to practice fieldwork and insect identification.

 

Honors Chemistry #138
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
10-12
Required:
Elective
Prerequisites:
Teacher Approval
Academic Standard(s):

This class will cover the same topics as traditional chemistry. The pace and labs however will be at a more accelerated rate.

 

Horticulture #11
Credits:
1
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
Elective
Prerequisites:
None
Academic Standard(s):
None

Objectives for the course:
Upon completion of Horticulture/ Greenhouse, students will:
1) Understand basic plant structure and the requirements for plant growth.
2) Be able to ID a set number of plants by common and scientific name.
3) Demonstrate understanding of the scientific method by conducting a plant experiment.
4) Propagate and transplant various plants for greenhouse production.
5) Have a basic understanding of greenhouse technology and management.
6) Be capable of properly operating the till.
7) Properly care for and maintain plants in the greenhouse.

 

Medical Careers #378
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11-12
Required:
Prerequisites:
Biology
Academic Standard(s):

Medical Careers is an exploratory course for students to get exposure to different medical fields for which they are interested. Students are expected to job shadow for a minimum of three hours. They will also be given the opportunity to listen to various speakers and visit several medical facilities.

Course Objectives:
Upon completion of the course, students will:
*Develop an understanding of how the healthcare system in America functions.
*Understand and explain how cultural competency and medical ethics play a role in patient care.
*Be able to demonstrate effect communication skills with patients and co-workers.
*Accurately utilize medical terminology.
*Demonstrate basic nursing skills such as checking vitals and using proper body mechanics to transfer a patient.
* Be exposed to a wide range of medical careers and have a general understanding of what those jobs involve.

 

Meteorology #116
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
physical science
Academic Standard(s):
none

This course looks at the dynamic forces of weather. Various factors of weather as well as storms and human interactions will be covered.

 

Microbiology #115
Credits:
.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Biology and principal consent if telemedia
Academic Standard(s):
none

Microbiology is the study of all organisms too small to be seen with the naked eye. In this course, you will study the differences between bacterial, viral and protozoan diseases. You will also learn how the organisms are transmitted, their pathology and epidemiology, and how their host may be treated. Students of microbiology will receive hands-on training in aseptic technique, streaking for isolation, Gram staining and basic microscopic work. Students will also do a comparative analysis between the nonfictional book The Hot Zone and the movie based on the book, Outbreak.

 

Physical Science #119
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
10
Required:
required
Prerequisites:
Biology
Academic Standard(s):
Research Process & Concepts in Physics.

CLASS SYLLABUS
GENERAL INFORMATION:
Teacher -- Mr. Patrick Merrick Room -- 120
Textbook -- Physical Science-Glencoe Length -- 1 credit

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course provides the learner with the opportunity to gain more knowledge on the very structure of nature itself. As this knowledge is gained, the learner will increase their appreciation of the structure and behavior of the world around them. Once this appreciation is instilled, the learner will be better equipped to evaluate the mass of science sound bites that are constantly being thrown at them in the name of public policy or advertising.
Physical Science is broken down into two sections, chemistry and physics. In the chemistry section we will discuss the micro-atomic world and how properties change when different atoms combine. In the physics section we will apply the basic laws of nature to understand the motion of objects around us. Not only is this information useful in everyday life, but it also impresses friends and dates to no end. Trust me.

OUTCOMES and COURSE OBJECTIVES:
1. To introduce the student to the nature of the physical world.
2. To allow the student to understand and use the scientific method in solving all problems
3. To show the student that an understanding of science is necessary in everyday life and all people can understand science.
4. The learner will be secure and mature enough to suggest and follow through with any other ideas in areas of physical science that is of interest.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
1. attendance and participation -- Because of school policy , students are required to attend class. Because of the teacher, students are required to participate in class. A/P will be graded each day by the following means: Attendance means being in your seat with the appropriate materials and staying in class all period. Participation means having your work completed and paying attention, in other words attitude. (smiles and waves are good bonuses)

2. Assignments and Projects -- This class will try and evolve into a project and discussion orientated class. (This means the more you talk the less I do.) Each section will contain a project of some degree that will measure your mastery of the material. Assignment and projects will have time lines and due dates to follow for full credit.

3. Tests and quizzes-- they will be there; good luck?!

4. Grading -- all assignments and tests are graded on a point basis. Points are totaled at the end of each quarter to determine final grades. Grades are calculated on the following percentages:
91 - 100 % = A
82 - 90 = B
73- 81 = C
64- 72 = D

GENERAL MUSINGS:

1. books  when books are given out, go over them carefully, note these are not new books, so take care of them. I will expect them back in the same condition. The only reason for you to have a book is to use / read it. Make sure you take advantage of the resource, because I will expect you to read all assignments.

2. labs  I will try to have one lab a week (usually on Thursdays). These labs serve a twofold purpose, first they allow you to move around in the classroom and enjoy hands-on science. Second they are a great way to understand the concept. They are not a day off! Lab reports will be due on each lab and the quality of the answers will be judged.

3. needs  You will need a notebook, writing utensil (no red or pink ), a calculator, and a folder for handouts, labs, etc. These things plus your book should be brought everyday. If you need to borrow, there will be a fine assessed.

4. Homework - is do on the date assigned. It is worth full points if handed in when asked for. It is worth 75% of possible if handed in before the next time we meet. It is worth 50% on the third day, and 0% after that. You will be expected to have everything necessary with you. You will not be allowed to go to your locker during class. I give out assignments because I feel that the information covered is valuable. Therefore, if you have 2 or more missing grades you will receive a failing grade for that quarter.

5. No hats or food is allowed in class unless a special situation arises.

6. The goal of this class is also to reinforce effort and responsibility. To this end, each assignment turned in on time and at a minimum level has the ability to be corrected. These corrections will be graded and returned. It is my hope that we will keep working on the assignment until the concept is mastered. Finally, most assignments will be handed back for your corrections. If an assignment is a learning tool, then the first time the assignment is turned in should not be the last time you look at it.

 

Physics #122
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Biology and Chemistry
Academic Standard(s):
none

CLASS SYLLABUS

GENERAL INFORMATION:
Teacher -- Mr. Patrick Merrick
Room -- 120
length -- 1 semester
textbook -- Physics - Merrill

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course provides the learner with the opportunity to gain more knowledge on the very structure of nature itself. As this knowledge is gained, the learner will increase their appreciation of the structure and behavior of the world around them. Once this appreciation is instilled, the learner will be better equipped to evaluate the mass of science sound bites that are constantly being thrown at them in the name of public policy or advertising.
Physics is broken down into four sections, Mechanics, Waves, Electricity, and Modern. In the Mechanics section, we will apply the basic laws of nature to understand the motion of objects around us. In the Waves section, we will be looking at sound, and light and the properties that allow waves to be an energy source. In the Electricity section we will be covering electricity (bet you knew that). In the Modern section we will cover relativity. Not only is this information useful in everyday life, but it also impresses friends and dates to no end. Trust me.

OUTCOMES and COURSE OBJECTIVES:
1. The learner will be able to understand and use the scientific method in solving problems.
2. The learner will be able to see the connections between what they are learning and the world around them
3. The learner will see the enjoyment of science.
4. The learner will be able to finish and comprehend an independent experiment.
5. The learner will be able to understand the interaction of forces.
6. The learner will be introduced to the interaction of light and sound.
7. The learner will be secure and mature enough to suggest and follow through with any other ideas on areas of physics that is of interest.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
1. attendance and participation -- A/P will be graded each day by the following means: Attendance means being in your seat with the appropriate materials and staying in class all period. Participation means having your work completed and paying attention in other words attitude. ( smiles and waves are good bonuses)


2. Assignments and Projects -- This class will try and evolve into a project and discussion orientated class. (This means the more you talk the less I do.) Each section will contain a project of some degree that will measure your mastery of the material. Assignment and projects will have time lines and due dates to follow for full credit.

3. Tests and quizzes-- they will be there (no surprises) good luck?!

4. Grading -- all assignments and tests are graded on a point basis. Points are totaled at the end of each quarter to determine final grades. Grades are calculated on the following percentages:
91 - 100 % = A
82 - 90 = B
73 - 81 = C
64 - 72 = D

GENERAL MUSINGS:
1. books When books are given out, go over them carefully and take care of them. I will expect it back in the same condition. You will be expected to read all chapters. Some questions on assignments will be from the book and not from class discussion.

2. labs I will try to have one lab a week (usually on Thursdays). These labs serve a twofold purpose, first they allow you to move around in the classroom and enjoy handson science. Second they are a great way to understand the concept. They are not a day off! Lab reports will be due on each lab and the quality of the answers will be judged.

3. needs You will need a notebook, writing utensil (no red or pink ), a calculator, and a folder for handouts, labs, etc.

4. Homework - is do on the date assigned. It is worth full points if handed in when asked for. It is worth 75% of possible if handed in before the next time we meet. It is worth 50% on third day and 0% after that. You will be expected to have everything necessary with you. You will not be allowed to go to your locker during class. I give out assignments because I feel that the information covered is valuable. Therefore, if you have 2 or more missing grades you will receive a failing grade for that midterm.

5. No hats or food are allowed in class unless a special situation arises.

6. The goal of this class is also to reinforce effort and responsibility. To this end, each assignment turned in on time and at a minimum level has the ability to be corrected. These corrections will be graded and returned. It is my hope that we will keep working on the assignment until the concept is mastered. Finally, most assignments will be handed back for your corrections. If an assignment is a learning tool, then the first time the assignment is turned in should not be the last time you look at it.

 

Principles of Flight #127
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
physical science
Academic Standard(s):
none

This course allows the student to explore the principles of flight from the first kites to the latest rockets. Students will be building models of different modes of flight.

 

YES / RENEWABLE ENERGY #117
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Academic Standard(s):
none

Students will create and execute their own ideas for energy reduction, or overall improvement of our local environment. Students will then display and explain their projects to varied groups of interested people.

 

Sixth Grade
Social Studies
Minnesota History #144
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
7
Required:
Prerequisites:
Academic Standard(s):

Minnesota History 7A
Ms. Holt
holtfac@westbrook.mntm.org
(507) 274-6111 ext 41

Class Description:
To examine the history of Minnesota, including its people, geography, biology and economy. Topics will include the Dakota Conflict, immigrants to the area, pioneers and traders/trappers, industry and natural resources.

Materials: -Northern Lights textbook.
-Additional texts will be used as primary sources.
-Videos and video clips about the people of Minnesota.
-Map work.
-Internet sources and newspaper.

Class Objectives:
Upon completion of this class, students will:
1. Know Minnesotas unique aspects that make it different from other states.
2. Learn how Minnesota has changed throughout history.
3. Have a large knowledge of how Minnesota has impacted the country.
4. Have a large knowledge of the resources of Minnesota.
5. Demonstrate knowledge Minnesotas social, economic, and political changes and cultural achievements through out history.

Requirements:
-Attendance is key!! A large part of your grade will be based on your attendance.
- Participation is key!! Not only do you have to be in class you have to be an active member participating in class discussion.
For everyday that your assignment is late you will lose 5 points off the total amount of points. It will be your responsibility to get your missing work from the makeup folder and any notes you missed.
-All assignments must be turned in before the chapter/unit test is taken. Nothing from the previous chapter will be accepted after the test.
-Preparation is key!! Come to class on time, have all the supplies that you will need for the day, and all homework and assignments done.

Grade Categories:
Assignments/Class Activities/Participation
Quizzes and Tests
Projects

 

American Government #131
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
11/12
Required:
required
Prerequisites:
American History 9 & 10
Academic Standard(s):
US Citizenship & Economic Systems

Text: United States Government: Our Democracy, McGraw Hill, 2016

Necessary Materials:
Notebook, notebook for current events, pens/pencils, highlighters, & a three ring binder, you will be putting class materials in this binder throughout the quarter


Course description:
This course will help students discover the fundamentals of the government on the national, state, and local levels. The course will also explore the three branches of government, and the development and role of political parties.

Course goals:
Understand the process involved in the creation of laws and public policy, and analyze the purposes in promoting the general welfare and provide order in the United States.
Understand the principles of the legislative, executive, and judicial branch, and how each helps of the U.S. government function effectively.
Realize that DEMOCRACY IS NOT A SPECTATOR SPORT! Our government needs the majority of people getting involved to make it work. This class will help you learn how to do your part.

Topics covered:
Unit 1: Foundations of government
Unit 2: The Constitution and Bill of Rights
Unit 3: Legislative Branch
Unit 4: Executive Branch
Unit 5: Judicial Branch
Unit 6: Understanding Elections and the Political Process


Classroom Behavior/Expectations:
1) RESPECT! This means respect yourself, classroom/school property, respect other classmates, respect the teacher and any other individuals in the room (substitute teachers, guest speakers, etc.)
2) Bring to class a pen/pencil, notebook, assignments, and not your cellular phone (unless told otherwise). I will confiscate it if I see you using it.
3) Raise your hand if you would like to speak, refrain from interrupting others.
4) You may eat and drink in class. If someone spills or it becomes distracting, the privilege will be provoked.
5) Participate in class discussions and take all notes during lectures and discussions.

 

American History 10 #129
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
10
Required:
required
Prerequisites:
American History 9
Academic Standard(s):
Themes in U.S. History

The purpose of this course is to gain a greater understanding of the U.S. and its relationship with other nations from the period following the Great Depression to today. We begin in 1931, watch the rise of Adolf Hitler, the development of WWII, examine the culture of the baby boomers and the hippy generation, U.S. involvement in foreign conflicts, examine Watergate, Reaganomics, and bring it right to America’s current position, both foreign and domestic. See syllabus for details.

 

American History 9 #128
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
9
Required:
required
Prerequisites:
American Hisotry 08
Academic Standard(s):
Mn Standards

Teacher: Mrs. Hendrickson
AMERICAN HISTORY 9 e-mail: mhendri@mntm.org


Class Goals:
For students to be aware of the people that have influenced the formation of the United States.
For students to understand that they need to know the past in order to understand the events of today.
For students to be aware of the people and events that led to the United States being an influence in world events
For students to understand the people and events that led from the formation of the country to the period of time studied.

Materials: Textbook-Presntice Hall: United States History 2010 , Films that cover the time period. CNN student news will be used to present current American and World topics. A variety of film clips from educational videos, periodicals, maps and internet resources will be used in the class room.

Requirements:
 All classroom work is to be completed on time.
 Students will keep a notebook throughout the class to use as a review tool.
 Tests should be taken in pencil and it is recommend notes be in pen.
 Name, class, section and date are to be on every paper turned in. ---Papers without names can not be graded.
 Students will be required to complete a major project for the class.

All students will complete a book report first quarter and a project second quarter

Class Rules:
1. Raise your hand to speak and wait to be called on.
2. Ask permission to be out of your seat (example: sharpen pencil, throw away paper, tissue, etc.)
3. No hats or cell phones in the classroom.
4. No talking without permission
5. Have respect for others in the classroom and yourself.

Grading:
Grading will be based on class participation, behavior, daily work, tests, quizzes, projects and any other assigned work. If you are absent you are expected to get the assignments and notes and turn in by an assigned date. All work will be given a due date and required to be turned in at that time. If absent on the due date you will be given one day for each day absent upon returning before the work is classified late. Assignments will be given ample time to complete. Major projects will be given some class time but students will be expected to do work out side of the class.



Grading Scale:
A 100-95%
A- 94-92%
B+ 91-89%
B 88-86%
B- 85-83%
C+ 82-80%
C 79-77%
C- 76-74%
D+ 73-71%
D 70-68%
D- 67-65% F 64 and below



Ch 12 The Reconstruction Era

Students will demonstrate the knowledge of the consequences of Civil War and Reconstruction

The Student will understand the origins of racial segregation.


Rival Plans of Lincoln, Johnson and Congress
Reconstruction as it developed in the south for both freedmen and whites
The end of Reconstruction

Ch 13 The triumph of industry

The student will describe and analyze the linked processes of industrialization and urbanization after 1870

The student will describe how industrialization changed nature of work and the origins and role of labor unions in the 1870s 1880s and 1890s

Technology and Industrial Growth
The rise of Big Business
The Organized labor movement

Ch 14 Immigration and Urbanization

The student will demonstrate knowledge of the causes and consequences of the immigration to the United States from 1870 to the first World War

The new immigrants
Cities expand and change
Social and cultural Trends

Ch 15 The south and west transformed

The student will analyze the process of Westward Expansion in the late 19th century.

The new south
Westward Expansion and the American Indians
Transforming the west

Ch 16 The issues of the gilded age

The Student will understand the origins of racial segregation.

The student will understand the changing dynamics of national politics in the late 19th Century.

Segregation and social tensions
Political and economic challenges
Farmers and populism

Ch 17 The Progressive Era


The student will analyze the wide range of reform efforts known as Progressivism between 1890 and the first World War.

The drive for reform
Women make progress
The struggle against discrimination
Roosevelts square deal
Wilsons New Freedom

Ch 18 An emerging world power
Ch 19 World War 1 and beyond

The student will understand the causes and consequences of American expansion and the Spanish-American War.

The student will understand the causes and consequences of World War I.


The roots of imperialism
The Spanish-American War
The United States and East Asia
The United States and Latin America
From Neutrality to war
The home front
Wilson, War and Peace
Effects of the War

Ch 20 The Twenties

The student will understand how the United States changed politically, culturally, and economically from the end of World War I to the eve of the Great Depression.

A booming economy
The business of government
Social and cultural tensions
A new mass culture
A Harlem Renaissance

Ch 21 The Great Depression
Ch 22 the new Deal

The student will understand the origins and impact of Great Depression and the New Deal, 1929-1940.

Causes of the depression
Americans Face hard Times
Hoovers Response fails
FDR offers relief and recovery
The second New Deal
Effect of the New Deal
Culture of the 1930s

 

Asian History #193
Credits:
.5
Grade:
10-12
Required:
No
Prerequisites:
Social 9, Social 10, World History
Academic Standard(s):

This course will involve group discussion, independent learning, and presentations. It is imperative you read assigned readings to be able to participate in classroom discussions. Topics to be covered in class:

Geography of Southeast Asia (11 countries: Indonesia, East Timor, Brunei, Philippines, Malaysia, Cambodia, Myanmar, Laos, Vietnam, Singapore, Thailand)
History of Southeast Asia
Southeast Asian Religions- Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Christianity, Shamanism and Animism
Khmer Rouge
Vietnam War/Secret War
Hmong experience
Current issues in Southeast Asia

At the end of the course, students will be able to describe the geography and locate places of Southeast Asia, understand the precolonial and colonial history of the Southeast Asia, and explain the Southeast Asian religions of Buddhism, Hinduism, Shamanism and Animism. Students will also be able to examine the issues of the Vietnam War and Khmer Rouge in Cambodia and how that affected the people of Southeast Asia and Hmong, understand the Hmong experience in Laos and America, and current issues in Southeast Asia.

 

Global Studies (Soc. St. 8) #
Credits:
1
Grade:
8
Required:
yes
Prerequisites:
Social Studies 7
Academic Standard(s):
Social Studies

Necessary Materials:
Notebook, pens/pencils, highlighters, & a binder/folder, handouts
Text: Discovering World Geography, McGraw Hill, 2015

Welcome to 8th grade Global Studies! Students in grade 8 explore the regions of the world using geographic information from print and electronic sources. They analyze important trends in the modern world such as demographic change, shifting trade patterns, and intensified cultural interactions due to globalization. Students participate in civic discussion on contemporary issues, conduct historical inquiry, and study events over the last half century that have shaped the contemporary world. They learn that governments are based on different political philosophies and serve various purposes. By learning economic principles of trade and the factors that affect economic growth, students understand why there are different standards of living in countries around the world.

Classroom Behavior/Expectations:
1) RESPECT! This means respect yourself, classroom/school property, respect other classmates, respect the teacher and any other individuals in the room (substitute teachers, guest speakers, etc.)
2) Bring to class a pen/pencil, notebook, assignments, and not your cellular phone (unless told otherwise). I will confiscate it if I see you using it.
3) Raise your hand if you would like to speak, refrain from interrupting others.
4) You may eat and drink in class. If someone spills or it becomes distracting, the privilege will be provoked.
5) Participate in class discussions and take all notes during lectures and discussions.

 

Human Geography #136
Credits:
1
Grade:
11/12
Required:
Graduation requirement
Prerequisites:
American History 9 and 10
Academic Standard(s):
Human Geography

Course objectives:
Geography is a quarter long course that focuses on the distribution, processes and effects of human population on the planet. Units of study include landforms and water bodies, population, movement, culture, language, religion, ethnicity, political geography, land usage, and urban development.

Topics covered:
Unit 1: Geospatial Skills
This unit will explore how maps and other visual representations can be used to learn about our world as well as to solve problems and plan for the future. Areas of study will include topics such as types of maps, map projects, satellite imagery.
Unit 2: Places and Regions
This unit will explore what makes place unique using physical and human characteristics. Areas of study will include topics such as landforms, culture, ecosystems, climate change, and types of regions.
Unit 3: Human Systems
This unit will explore the characteristics, distribution, and migration of people on the Earths surface. Areas of study will include topics such as population, ethnicity, political geography, religion, and language.
Unit 4: Human Environment Interactions
This unit will explore how humans interact with their natural environment as well as patterns and networks of economic interdependence that can be seen on the Earths surface. Areas of study will include topics such as agriculture, industry, resource issues, and fossil fuels.

 

Psychology #134
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
elective, partially fulfills Senior Social
Prerequisites:
consent of principal
Academic Standard(s):
Social Science Process

Necessary Materials:
Notebook, notebook for current events, pens/pencils, highlighters, & a three ring binder, you will be putting class materials in this binder throughout the quarter
Textbook: Psychology in Modules by David Meyers
Various texts will be used from book excerpts, articles and videos.

Course objectives:
By the end of the course, students will:
Explain the biological processes involved in human thought.
Describe the cognitive processes that contribute to everyday experiences.
Describe the variation in development and psychological factors that contribute to individual behavior, personality and more.
Conduct a limited psychological study and understand psychological research methods.

Topics covered:
History of psychology, research strategies, psychological disorders, the brain, social psychology, memory, consciousness, learning, personality and human development.

This class will be taught like a college course. There will be independent reading, discussion and writing. It is imperative that students stay on top of assigned readings.

 

Social Studies 7 #460
Credits:
1
Grade:
7
Required:
Yes
Prerequisites:
Academic Standard(s):

MN Social Studies Standards for Grade 7 summary and class goals:

Necessary Materials:
Notebook, pens/pencils, highlighters, & a binder/folder, handouts
Text: Discovering our Past: A history of the United States, McGraw Hill, 2016

Welcome to 7th Grade American History! American History is designed to examine American History from the 1789 to present. Emphasis will be put on relating past historical facts with present day occurrences. Citizenship and government will be further enhanced with economic and geographic content that round out the study of United States History. Students will learn about people issues, and events of our nations history including events and their lasting impact on the American people, economy, and government structure.

Classroom Behavior/Expectations:
1) RESPECT! This means respect yourself, classroom/school property, respect other classmates, respect the teacher and any other individuals in the room (substitute teachers, guest speakers, etc.)
2) Bring to class a pen/pencil, notebook, assignments, and not your cellular phone (unless told otherwise). I will confiscate it if I see you using it.
3) Raise your hand if you would like to speak, refrain from interrupting others.
4) You may eat and drink in class. If someone spills or it becomes distracting, the privilege will be provoked.
5) Participate in class discussions and take all notes during lectures and discussions.

 

Sociology #135
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11/12
Required:
elective, partially fulfills Senior Social
Prerequisites:
World History
Academic Standard(s):
Issue Analysis & Institutions and Traditions

Necessary Materials:
Notebook, notebook for current events, pens/pencils, highlighters, & a three ring binder, you will be putting class materials in this binder throughout the quarter
Various texts will be used from book excerpts, articles and videos.

Course description:
How does society influence who you marry? How can deviance be explained as a normal part of society? Why do some families remain poor? Why do some students engage in binge drinking? We tend to look at personal issues from a purely individualistic perspective. This course will hopefully challenge you to think about yourself and your social environment in new waysfrom a sociological perspective. Sociology is a fascinating field. It enables us to understand the connection between the individual and society, to show how the most private elements in our lives affect and are affected by larger social phenomena such as cultures, groups, organizations, and social institutions.

Course objectives:
We will discuss many topics this quarter, and in each topic the major objectives are to have students:
Use a sociological imagination to examine and assess the relationship between the individual and society
Explain the way in which society and social processes shape our lives
Describe the major sociological theories and concepts and apply them to their everyday lives
Develop an appreciation for the impact of race, class, and gender upon social life
Practice inquiry by asking questions about and reflecting upon course readings
Do Sociology!

Topics covered:
History of sociology, sociological imagination, research strategies, socialization, culture, deviance and social control, social stratification, gender roles/stereotypes, social change and collective behavior

This class will be taught like a college course. There will be independent reading, discussion and writing. It is imperative that students stay on top of assigned readings and assignments.

 

World (Current) Affairs #133
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
elective, partially fulfills Senior Social
Prerequisites:
none
Academic Standard(s):
Diverse Perspectives

Students will learn of current affairs as they relate to past, present and future.

 

World History #130
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
11
Required:
required
Prerequisites:
American History 9 and American History 10
Academic Standard(s):
World History Survey, & Diverse Perspectives



This survey course will examine the history of the world by studying ancient civilizations, incorporating map study and educational videos in a discussion-based format. Rather than examine each culture in a vacuum, we will relate each civilization’s experience to what was happening in the rest of the
world to gain a contextual understanding of the people. Focus will be on the seven Cradles of Civilization. See the attached syllabus for details.

 

Special Programs
Arts Magnet Mentorship #175
Credits:
varies
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
application and consent of faculty and plan approv
Academic Standard(s):
none

A special program that allows students to focus on an arts area of their interest under teacher-mentor guidance. Request an application packet from the office

 

Elementary Teacher Cadet #219
Credits:
0.25
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
consent of instructor or Child Development or Occ
Academic Standard(s):
none

Assists elementary teacher in tutoring and class operation

 

English Help #155
Credits:
varies
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Required:
fulfills requirements
Prerequisites:
consent of instructor
Academic Standard(s):
none

English help through Special Education learning disabilities.

 

High School Office Cadet #218
Credits:
0.25
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
typing skills and principal consent
Academic Standard(s):
none

Student assists with operation of school office

 

High School Teacher Cadet #217
Credits:
0.25
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
consent of instructor
Academic Standard(s):
none

Assistant to a teacher. Does errands or peer tutoring.

 

Honors Program Option #173
Credits:
varies
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
consent of faculty and plan approval
Academic Standard(s):
none

A special academic program for students who desire to plan their own studies under the guidance of a teacher-mentor. See Handbook for details.

 

Math Help #157
Credits:
varies
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Required:
fulfills requirements
Prerequisites:
consent of instructor
Academic Standard(s):
none

Math help through Special Education learning disabilities

 

Math Help #159
Credits:
varies
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Required:
fulfills requirements
Prerequisites:
none
Academic Standard(s):
none

Reading help through Special Education learning disabilities.

 

Pre-School #1000
Credits:
Grade:
Required:
Prerequisites:
Academic Standard(s):

 

Special Education Resource #161
Credits:
varies
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Required:
fulfills requirements
Prerequisites:
Individualized Educational Plan /consent of team
Academic Standard(s):
none

For students with special learning needs that are not adequately met in a regular classroom setting

 

test
test
Test #
Credits:
Grade:
Required:
Prerequisites:
Academic Standard(s):

 

Test #1000
Credits:
1
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
test
Prerequisites:
test
Academic Standard(s):
test

Test

 

Test2 #
Credits:
Grade:
Required:
Prerequisites:
Academic Standard(s):

 

World Languages
Westbrook-Walnut Grove offers High School students three Spanish courses. Those courses are Beginning Spanish, Intermediate Spanish and Advanced Spanish.

World Language classes are not a requirement for high school graduation, but most 4 year colleges in the state of Minnesota require at least 2 years of a World Language for college entrance (some colleges encourage 3 or 4 years).
Beginning Spanish #148
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
none
Academic Standard(s):
World Language

Spanish 1
Teacher: Mr. Menton
Email: mentonfac@wwgschools.org
Phone: 507.274.6111 ext. 33
Fax: 507.274.6113

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
Students will begin learning the basics of Spanish language and culture. They will engage in activities that promote the five Cs of foreign language acquisition: communications, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities. Students will be able to use Spanish by the end of the course, and should be prepared to continue their language learning in Intermediate Spanish.

COURSE OUTLINE:
Students will learn Spanish through speaking, listening, reading, and writing activities. They will be able to communicate about familiar topics in the present tense. They will also learn about many Spanish speaking countries and gain an understanding of new cultures and perspectives.

 

Sign Language #182
Credits:
0.5
Grade:
11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
principal consent
Academic Standard(s):
World Language

Introduction to the art of signing. [TELEMEDIA] Grad Standard: World Language-American Sign Language

 

Spanish Three #150
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Spanish Two
Academic Standard(s):

Spanish 3
Teacher: Mr. Menton
Email: mentonfac@wwgschools.org
Phone: 507.274.6111 ext. 33
Fax: 507.274.6113

Course Objectives:
Students will continue learning Spanish through reading, writing, speaking, and listening activities. They will deepen their understanding of grammar and expand their vocabulary.

Course Outline:
Students will use the ¡Avancemos! level 2 textbook and continue using stories and activities from a variety of books. Students will take exams at the end of units, write a story in the past tense, and do several oral presentations throughout the year.

 

Spanish Two #149
Credits:
1.0
Grade:
10, 11, 12
Required:
elective
Prerequisites:
Spanish One
Academic Standard(s):
World Language-Spanish

Spanish 2
Teacher: Mr. Menton
Email: mentonfac@wwgschools.org
Phone: 507.274.6111 ext. 33
Fax: 507.274.6113

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
Students will continue learning the basics of Spanish language and culture. They will engage in activities that promote the five Cs of foreign language acquisition: communications, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities. Students will be able to use Spanish by the end of the course, and will be prepared to continue their language learning in Spanish III. Students will also gain a deeper understanding of global perspectives and diversity.

COURSE OUTLINE:
This course focuses on a deeper understanding of Spanish grammar, vocabulary, and culture. Students will use online resources, in-class notes, and activities from the textbook, ¡Avancemos! 1. There will be one exam at the end of each unit, as well as grammar and vocabulary quizzes and homework. There will be a cumulative exam at the end of each semester, as well as a final project. Students should expect a fast paced course. Material is continuously practiced and reviewed throughout the year, so dont get discouraged! ¡Sí se puede!

 

 

 

 

For questions or comments about our site, please contact: Duane Hannan